Drinking coffee may reduce risk of heart failure and stroke, research suggests

037264f4-fc79-4035-bf14-a437946863edarticleimage.jpg

14 Nov 2017 --- Drinking coffee may be associated with a decreased risk of developing heart failure or having a stroke, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s (AHA) Scientific Sessions 2017, a global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Researchers used machine learning to analyze data from the long-running Framingham Heart Study, which includes information about what people eat and their cardiovascular health. They found that drinking coffee was associated with decreased risk of developing heart failure by 7 percent and stroke by 8 percent with every additional cup of coffee consumed per week compared with non-coffee drinkers.

The AHA also points out that it is important to note this type of study design demonstrates an observed association but does not prove cause and effect.

Coffee decreases risk consistently
Machine learning works by finding associations within data, much in the same way that online shopping sites predict products that users may like based on their shopping history. It is one type of big data analysis, the AHA notes.

To ensure the validity of their results and determine the direction of risk, the researchers further investigated the machine learning results using traditional analysis in two studies with similar sets of data – the Cardiovascular Heart Study and the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. The association between drinking coffee and a decreased risk of heart failure and stroke was consistently noted in all three studies.

While many risk factors for heart failure and stroke are well known, the researchers believe it is likely that there are as-yet-unidentified risk factors. “Our findings suggest that machine learning could help us identify additional factors to improve existing risk assessment models,” says Laura M. Stevens, B.S., first author of the study, a doctoral student at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora, Colorado.

“The risk assessment tools we currently use for predicting whether someone might develop heart disease, particularly heart failure or stroke, are very good but they are not 100 percent accurate,” Stevens adds.

Red meat presents additional risk
Another potential risk factor identified by machine-learning analysis was red meat consumption, although the association between red meat consumption and heart failure or stroke was less clear.

Eating red meat was associated with decreased risk of heart failure and stroke in the Framingham Heart Study but validating the finding in comparable studies is more challenging due to differences in the definitions of red meat between studies. Further investigation to better determine how red meat consumption affects risk for heart failure and stroke is ongoing, according to the AHA.

The researchers also built a predictive model using known risk factors from the Framingham Risk Score such as blood pressure, age and other patient characteristics associated with cardiovascular disease. “By including coffee in the model, the prediction accuracy increased by 4 percent. Machine learning may be a useful addition to the way we look at data and help us find new ways to lower the risk of heart failure and strokes,” says David Kao, M.D., senior author of the study and an assistant professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora, Colorado.

When it comes to overall diet, the AHA suggests limiting red meat, which is high in saturated fat, as part of a healthy dietary pattern that should emphasize, fruit, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy products, poultry and fish.

Coffee’s health benefits may not stop at heart health, as recent research has suggested that it could help to delay the onset of Type 2 diabetes and prevent liver fibrosis. An example of a recent product launch in the coffee space with a health positioning is CoffeeFruit Pure’s namesake antioxidant-rich super fruit ingredient

Related Articles

Nutrition & Health News

Yogurt may reduce cardiovascular disease risk

19 Feb 2018 --- A higher yogurt intake is associated with lower cardiovascular disease risk among hypertensive men and women, a study in the American Journal of Hypertension suggests. High blood pressure is a major cardiovascular disease risk factor. Clinical trials have previously demonstrated beneficial effects of dairy consumption on cardiovascular health, and yogurt may independently be related to cardiovascular disease risk.

Nutrition & Health News

Plant-based foods could slash a country’s healthcare costs by billions of euros, says study

15 Feb 2018 --- Billions of euros could be saved from a country’s annual healthcare bill over the next years if more people followed a plant-based diet. This is according to a new study published in the Journal of Nutrition which looked at the health and economic consequences of two plant-based eating patterns, a diet with a daily portion of soy foods and a Mediterranean-style diet.

Nutrition & Health News

Bad for the heart: Lobby group slams retailers for high salt meals for Valentine’s Day 

14 Feb 2018 --- Top retailers are providing excessive salt, calories, saturated fat and sugars in their Valentine’s “dine-in” meal deals at bargain prices – that is the assertion from Consensus Action on Salt and Health (CASH), a campaign group concerned with salt and its effects on health. The UK organization has carried out a new survey that reveals high levels of salt “hidden” in Valentine’s Day meal deals on sale at some of Britain’s biggest supermarkets. 

Nutrition & Health News

AFS debuts “first-ever” Non-GMO Project verified caffeine ingredient

09 Feb 2018 --- Applied Food Sciences, Inc. (AFS) is bolstering its transparency credentials by achieving Non-GMO Project verification for four of its core ingredients – and this important move can help brands incorporate organic caffeine into products and boost clean labels in the process. PurCaf organic Caffeine – a 95 percent caffeine extract from organic green coffee beans – headlines a list of innovative and sustainably sourced offerings by AFS. The others are PurTea Organic Caffeine, a 90 percent caffeine extract from organic green tea leaves; JAVA.g, a polyphenolic blend of caffeine and antioxidants from green coffee beans and GCA, what AFS describes as “the highest quality green coffee bean extract available on the market.”

Business News

Consumer health care: Nestle loses interest in Merck's OTC unit 

05 Feb 2018 --- Nestle has pulled out of the bid for Merck’s consumer health unit, leaving the race to buy the maker of Seven Seas vitamins and various other nutritional supplements without its main contender, Reuters reports. The news came a week after Johnson & Johnson withdrew from the race to buy US drugmaker Pfizer’s consumer health business, leaving Nestlé, GlaxoSmithKline and Reckitt Benckiser among the potential bidders. 

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/news/drinking-coffee-may-reduce-risk-of-heart-failure-and-stroke-research-suggests.html