Study: Heart-Attack Survivors Who Eat Lots of Fibre Live Longer

30 Apr 2014 --- Heart-attack survivors are more likely to live for a further nine years if they follow a high-fibre diet, according to a study in the British Medical Journal. The findings showed that for every daily 10g increase in fibre intake, there was a corresponding 15% drop in ‘risk of death’ during the study.

A team of researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health analysed data from two large US studies, involving more than 4,000 men and women who had survived their first heart attack, and had provided information about their diet via questionnaires.  These people were followed for an average of nine years after their heart attacks, during which time 682 of the women and 451 of the men died.

The results showed that those who ate the most fibre had a 25% lower chance of dying from any cause during the nine years, compared with the fifth who ate the least.

“Future research on lifestyle changes post-MI should focus on a combination of lifestyle changes and how they may further reduce mortality rates beyond what is achievable by medical management alone,” the researchers concluded.

On average most people in the UK get about 14g of fibre a day, versus a target of at least 18g for adults. US experts meanwhile, recommend a minimum of up to 38g a day for men and 25g for women. Less than 5% of Americans reach this target.

"High-fibre foods are a key part of a healthy balanced diet, and this study suggests they may have a particular benefit for heart-attack survivors,” said Victoria Taylor, from the British Heart Foundation. "Fibre comes from a range of foods, including fruit and veg, beans and lentils, and also from cereal products, which this study found to be particularly beneficial.

A low-fibre diet is associated with constipation and gut diseases, such as diverticulosis and bowel cancer, but it may also have implications for heart health, according to the US study.

A recent study, also published in the BMJ, showed eating more cereals and whole grains could reduce the risk of developing colorectal cancer. The researchers, from Imperial College London, found that for every 10g a day increase in fibre intake, there was a 10% drop in the risk of bowel cancer.

Related Articles

Nutrition & Health News

Yogurt may reduce cardiovascular disease risk

19 Feb 2018 --- A higher yogurt intake is associated with lower cardiovascular disease risk among hypertensive men and women, a study in the American Journal of Hypertension suggests. High blood pressure is a major cardiovascular disease risk factor. Clinical trials have previously demonstrated beneficial effects of dairy consumption on cardiovascular health, and yogurt may independently be related to cardiovascular disease risk.

Nutrition & Health News

Ultra-processed foods linked to heightened risk of cancer: major BMJ study

15 Feb 2018 --- Although processed foods have long been thought to be significantly less healthy than non-processed foods, an observational study published yesterday in BMJ has added some stark figures to the link between ultra-processed foods and the risk of cancer. The study concluded that a 10 percent increase in the proportion of ultra-processed foods in the diet is associated with increases of 12 percent in the risk of overall cancer and 11 percent in the risk of breast cancer.

Nutrition & Health News

Bridging the fiber gap: Tereos launches website on dietary fiber

13 Feb 2018 --- Consuming an adequate amount of fiber plays an important role in a wide range of health-related issues, by helping to reduce obesity, improve cholesterol and glycemic index levels and contribute to weight management. To educate consumers about dietary fibers, Tereos has launched a new website, which it says makes it easy to understand the company's Actilight fiber ingredient, its benefits and origin. 

Nutrition & Health News

Aronia as a trending superfruit: RTD start-up ax-water's infused waters

07 Feb 2018 --- Native to the Midwest region of North America, but still largely unknown in the US, the aronia berry is the nutrient-packed superfood for which the consumer health industry has been waiting. This is according to ax-water, a US health and wellness beverage company cornering this new market in the US with a range of aronia berry infused waters. NutritionInsight spoke with Blake Johnson, agriculture and biosystems engineer and Co-Founder of ax-water, about the merits of this “superfruit.”

Nutrition & Health News

Arla Foods launches high fiber yogurt in the UK

30 Jan 2018 --- Arla Foods has launched a new range of yogurts containing 4.7g of fiber in every serving. The range is called Arla Fibre and is available in four flavors; Blueberry, Raspberry, Pineapple & Passionfruit and Strawberry. Arla Fibre comes in in both small (150g, available in Pineapple & Passionfruit and Raspberry) and large (450g, available in Strawberry and Blueberry) pots. The large pots in the yogurt aisle in Tesco from 29 January and both small and large pots from March in other major UK supermarkets. 

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/news/Study-Heart-Attack-Survivors-Who-Eat-Lots-of-Fibre-Live-Longer.html