Higher Dietary Fiber Intake in Young Women May Reduce Breast Cancer Risk

01 Feb 2016 --- Women who eat more high-fiber foods during adolescence and young adulthood--especially lots of fruits and vegetables--may have significantly lower breast cancer risk than those who eat less dietary fiber when young, according to a new large-scale study led by researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

"Previous studies of fiber intake and breast cancer have almost all been non-significant, and none of them examined diet during adolescence or early adulthood, a period when breast cancer risk factors appear to be particularly important," said Maryam Farvid, visiting scientist at Harvard Chan School and lead author of the study. "This work on the role of nutrition in early life and breast cancer incidence suggests one of the very few potentially modifiable risk factors for premenopausal breast cancer."

The researchers looked at a group of 90,534 women who participated in the Nurses' Health Study II, a large long-running investigation of factors that influence women's health. In 1991, the women--ages 27-44 at the time--filled out questionnaires about their food intake, and did so every four years after that. They also completed a questionnaire in 1998 about their diet during high school. The researchers analyzed the women's fiber intake while adjusting for a number of other factors, such as race, family history of breast cancer, body mass index, weight change over time, menstruation history, alcohol use, and other dietary factors.

Breast cancer risk was 12%-19% lower among women who ate more dietary fiber in early adulthood, depending on how much more they ate. High intake of fiber during adolescence was also associated with 16% lower risk of overall breast cancer and 24% lower risk of breast cancer before menopause. Among all the women, there was a strong inverse association between fiber intake and breast cancer incidence. For each additional 10 grams of fiber intake daily--for example, about one apple and two slices of whole wheat bread, or about half a cup each of cooked kidney beans and cooked cauliflower or squash--during early adulthood, breast cancer risk dropped by 13%. The greatest apparent benefit came from fruit and vegetable fiber.

The authors speculated that eating more fiber-rich foods may lessen breast cancer risk partly by helping to reduce high estrogen levels in the blood, which are strongly linked with breast cancer development.

"From many other studies we know that breast tissue is particularly influenced by carcinogens and anticarcinogens during childhood and adolescence," said Walter Willett, Fredrick John Stare Professor of Epidemiology and Nutrition at Harvard Chan School and senior author of the study. "We now have evidence that what we feed our children during this period of life is also an important factor in future cancer risk."

Related Articles

Nutrition & Health News

Drink your vitamins: SternVitamin launches micronutrient premix for beverages 

19 Feb 2018 --- A healthy lifestyle is essential to all age groups, and nutrition plays a major role alongside various other components. SternVitamin is now offering beverage manufacturers a novel way to address the topic of health with a new micronutrient premix for healthy bones and heart. SternVitamin notes that the mix picks up on one of the top trends in the beverage market – water-based enriched products. The vegan premix contains vitamins B1, B12, C, K2 and D3. Organic agave syrup powder gives it a slight sweetness, while natural flavors give the drink a “dark berry” taste. It dissolves clear in water and leaves no turbidity. 

Nutrition & Health News

Yogurt may reduce cardiovascular disease risk

19 Feb 2018 --- A higher yogurt intake is associated with lower cardiovascular disease risk among hypertensive men and women, a study in the American Journal of Hypertension suggests. High blood pressure is a major cardiovascular disease risk factor. Clinical trials have previously demonstrated beneficial effects of dairy consumption on cardiovascular health, and yogurt may independently be related to cardiovascular disease risk.

Nutrition & Health News

Research driving demand for OPO in China’s formula market: Advanced Lipids

16 Feb 2018 --- OPO is increasing in popularity in China’s infant formula market, and according to Advanced Lipids, this is down to the growing body of scientific research backing the benefits of this ingredient. Also known as SN-2 palmitate, OPO is a premium quality ingredient that mimics the fatty acid profile of human milk.

Nutrition & Health News

Ultra-processed foods linked to heightened risk of cancer: major BMJ study

15 Feb 2018 --- Although processed foods have long been thought to be significantly less healthy than non-processed foods, an observational study published yesterday in BMJ has added some stark figures to the link between ultra-processed foods and the risk of cancer. The study concluded that a 10 percent increase in the proportion of ultra-processed foods in the diet is associated with increases of 12 percent in the risk of overall cancer and 11 percent in the risk of breast cancer.

Nutrition & Health News

Plant-based foods could slash a country’s healthcare costs by billions of euros, says study

15 Feb 2018 --- Billions of euros could be saved from a country’s annual healthcare bill over the next years if more people followed a plant-based diet. This is according to a new study published in the Journal of Nutrition which looked at the health and economic consequences of two plant-based eating patterns, a diet with a daily portion of soy foods and a Mediterranean-style diet.

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/news/Higher-Dietary-Fiber-Intake-in-Young-Women-May-Reduce-Breast-Cancer-Risk.html