Weight Management

Sporadic fasting helps fight obesity, study finds

18 Oct 2017 --- Up to 16 weeks of intermittent fasting without otherwise having to count calories helps fight obesity and other metabolic disorders, and the benefits of such fasting are already noticeable after six weeks. This is according to a study by Kyoung-Han Kim and Yun Hye Kim in the journal Cell Research which is published by Springer Nature. Intermittent fasting in mice helped to kick-start the animals' metabolism and to burn fat by generating body heat. 

NHS targets obesity with 250-calorie limit on confectionery sold in hospitals

17 Oct 2017 --- Super-size chocolate bars and “grab bags” of sugar-laden snacks will be banned in UK hospitals as part of the NHS’ latest plan to fight obesity, diabetes and tooth decay. NHS England has announced a 250-calorie limit on confectionery sold in hospital canteens, stores, vending machines and other outlets as the British healthcare service, Europe’s largest employer, forges ahead with steps to curb the availability of unhealthy food and drinks that are fueling an obesity crisis. 

Junk food ad spending outstrips UK government campaigns as healthcare costs of obesity soar

13 Oct 2017 --- Money spent last year on junk food advertising in the UK far outweighed the amount the government spent on healthy eating campaigns, leading to an unbalanced environment pushing the British public towards unhealthy choices, according to new analysis by the Obesity Health Alliance (OHA).

Most important meal? Skipping breakfast does not lead to overeating later: study

12 Oct 2017 --- Teenage girls who skipped breakfast as part of a study into energy intake and physical activity were found to consume 350 fewer calories during the day as a whole. 

Stunning World Obesity Day statistics note tenfold increase in child obesity since 1975

11 Oct 2017 --- Today marks World Obesity Day, and a new study published in The Lancet has put into perspective the present and future extent of the global health problem. The study notes that there has been a tenfold increase in the number of children and adolescents with obesity worldwide since 1975, and the world will have more obese children and adolescents (aged 5 to 19 years) than underweight by 2022, if current trends continue.

Omega 3, antioxidants key in slowing age-related inflammation: report

09 Oct 2017 --- A group of experts believes evidence exists in the elderly for omega 3 fatty acid, probiotic, prebiotic, antioxidant and polyphenol interventions as a means to influence “inflammaging” – aging characterized by increased levels of inflammatory markers in the bloodstream – and to boost healthy aging.

Fructose has more damaging metabolic effects than glucose, study suggests

06 Oct 2017 --- Researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center have found that mice on a fatty diet who were given high levels of fructose in their diet suffered much worse metabolic effects than those given similar calories of glucose, the other component in table sugar. The scientists went on to pinpoint biological processes that help to explain the different outcomes.

Black tea benefits weight loss as study suggests it is a prebiotic

04 Oct 2017 --- UCLA researchers have demonstrated for the first time that black tea may promote weight loss and other health benefits by altering bacteria in the gut. In a study of mice, the scientists showed that black tea alters energy metabolism in the liver by changing gut metabolites.

Satiety can prompt a desire to eat more, researchers find

02 Oct 2017 --- When hunger pangs strike, we usually interpret them as a cue to reach for a snack; when we start to feel full, we take it as a sign that we should stop eating. But new research shows that these associations can be learned the other way around, such that satiety becomes a cue to eat more, not less.

Forewarned: Researchers map a timeline of damage caused by obesity

29 Sep 2017 --- A new experiment has set out a timeline of obesity’s negative effects. The study in mice showed that the neuronal damage associated with an obesogenic diet starts well before the individual begins to gain weight, but can be reversed early in the process. However, if the inadequate diet persists, injury to the neuron becomes irreversible.

ID Nutra’s satiety product gets EFSA novel food nod

28 Sep 2017 --- The thirst and hunger suppressing specimen H. parviflora, marketed by ID Nutra as SatiPlus, has been approved as a novel food by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). The product’s potential benefits include a host of advantages related to weight loss and metabolism.

Australian survey uncovers main diet derailers per personality type

21 Sep 2017 --- A new Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) report has analyzed the five main diet-related personality types of more than 90,000 Australian adults to gain an insight into why many people find it hard to maintain a healthy diet. In what is the nation's largest-ever diet and personality survey, food cravings were found to be one of the most common reasons diets get derailed.

Study finds that nuts in diet can stop kilos piling on and lower likelihood of obesity

21 Sep 2017 --- People who include nuts in their diet are more likely to reduce weight gain and lower the risk of overweight and obesity, according to a study recently published online in the European Journal of Nutrition. The findings came to light after researchers at Loma Linda University School of Public Health and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) evaluated diet and lifestyle data from more than 373,000 individuals from 10 European countries between the ages of 25 and 70.

ADM to explore personalized nutrition with Mayo Clinic

20 Sep 2017 --- Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM) has announced a collaboration with Mayo Clinic in the field of personalized nutrition. The company will work with Mayo’s Microbiome Program, led by Dr. Heidi Nelson, to investigate microbial solutions to improve health and wellness, initially focusing on the maintenance of healthy body weight.

Taking a break from your diet may actually help with keeping kilos off

20 Sep 2017 --- Avoiding continuous dieting may be the secret to actually keeping the weight off, according to research from the University of Tasmania. In findings published in the International Journal for Obesity, School of Health Sciences researchers showed in a randomized controlled trial that taking a two-week break during dieting may improve weight loss.

Protein supplementation doesn’t help to keep weight off after weight loss, study suggests

19 Sep 2017 --- Protein supplementation does not result in improved weight management success or blood biochemistry after weight loss compared with the effects of normal dietary protein intake. This is according to a study sponsored by the University of Copenhagen and collaborated on by Danish companies Arla Foods and Nupo A/S.

Body’s own fat metabolism fights against harmful effects of sugar, study finds

19 Sep 2017 --- Researchers from Aarhus University in Denmark have discovered a metabolite that reveals how the body's fat metabolism provides protection against the harmful effects of sugar. The researchers have indicated this has the potential to explain the chemical link between a low-carbohydrate diet and healthy aging.

Landmark in calorie intake understanding as link to extended lifespan explained

18 Sep 2017 --- Researchers have found an explanation for why cutting calorie intake could dramatically extend lifespan in certain animal species. In work published online in Nature Communications, investigators at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University (LKSOM) in Philadelphia, US, are the first to show that the speed at which the epigenome changes with age is associated with lifespan across species and that calorie restriction slows this process of change, potentially explaining its effects on longevity.

Lack of fruit and vegetables puts Mexican-American children at risk of obesity

14 Sep 2017 --- Potential disparities in fruit and vegetable intake in Mexican-American children may mean that they are at greater risk for obesity and related health problems, new research suggests.

Further cardiovascular evidence suggests there is no such thing as “healthy obesity”

11 Sep 2017 --- Clinicians have been warned by the results of a University of Birmingham study not to ignore the increased cardiovascular health risks of those who are either classed as “healthy obese” or deemed to be “normal weight” while having metabolic abnormalities such as diabetes.