Yogurt Consumption Linked to Reduced Risk of Osteoporosis

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15 May 2017 --- A new study by researcher from Trinity College in Dublin has found positive correlation between yogurt consumption and bone health. Considered the largest observational study of dairy intake and bone and health to date, the researchers found that higher hip bone density and a significantly reduced risk of osteoporosis in older populations was associated with an increased yogurt consumption after taking into account traditional risk factors. The study is further evidence to support the idea that dairy products contain valuable nutrients for the maintenance of bone health.

The researchers focused on Irish adults and examined 763 men and 1,057 women who underwent a bone-mineral-density (BMD) assessment. They also looked at 1,290 men and 2,624 women who had their physical function measured. The participants' amount of yogurt consumption was determined by a questionnaire and adjusted for other factors including the consumption of other dairy products, meat, fish, smoking and alcohol and other traditional risk factors that affect bone health.

The lead author of the study, Dr. Eamon Laird, comments, "Yogurt is a rich source of different bone promoting nutrients and thus our findings in some ways are not surprising. The data suggest that improving yogurt intakes could be a strategy for maintaining bone health but it needs verification through future research as it is observational."

"The results demonstrate a significant association of bone health and frailty with a relatively simple and cheap food product. What is now needed is verification of these observations from randomized controlled trials as we still don't understand the exact mechanisms which could be due to the benefits of micro-biota or the macro and micro nutrient composition of the yogurt," adds Dr Miriam Casey, senior investigator of this study and Consultant Physician at St James's Hospital Dublin.

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