Patients with high blood pressure rely on medication over salt reduction, study finds

636710384761746807Salt.jpg

28 Aug 2018 --- Patients with high blood pressure are relying solely on medication to reduce their risk of heart attack, stroke and heart failure, rather than decreasing salt intake as instructed by their physicians, according to research presented at the ESC Congress 2018, the annual meeting of the European Society of Cardiology.

Lack of adherence to recommended lifestyle changes is leading to higher salt intake for hypertensive patients, more medications needed to treat their condition and more side effects from those medications, according to lead author Dr. Kazuto Ohno of the Enshu Hospital, Hamamatsu, Japan.

“Blood pressure does see decreases due to medication and treatment. However, it is necessary not only to rely on medication alone but also to reduce salt intake to improve adherence of oral administration and to prevent side effects caused by drugs,” Dr. Ohno tells NutritionInsight.

“Patients may be able to improve this vicious cycle by restricting salt intake,” Dr. Ohno adds. “In consequence, they may avoid diseases caused by hypertension, such as heart attacks, stroke, and heart failure. Moreover, they may be able to avoid side effects from antihypertensive drugs, such as dizziness and fainting.”

Excess salt intake is one of the most important causes of hypertension and salt restriction is a key strategy to manage it, but few studies have been done on the relationship between salt intake and blood pressure in hypertensive patients undergoing antihypertensive drug treatment.

The study
Study authors enrolled 12,422 patients taking medication for hypertension who visited the hospital for a physical checkup from 2010-2016. Individual salt intake was estimated in grams per day using a spot urine calculation formula shown to be effective in previous studies.

Blood pressure levels and patients maintaining the target blood pressure of less than 140/90mmHg improved during the seven-year study among all groups, but individual salt intake increased across all groups as well.

“Although blood pressure values in hypertensive patients had lowered, salt intake was gradually increased,” says Dr. Ohno. “We think improvement in blood pressure control is not due to salt restriction but due to drug treatment.”

Guidelines for the Management of Hypertension 2014 published by the Japanese Society of Hypertension, recommend less than six grams of salt intake per day, but less than four percent of study participants were following those recommendations.

Patients in the study were divided into three groups according to whether they were currently prescribed one, two, three or more antihypertensive drugs.

“The observational study in hypertensive patients with antihypertensive drugs found two comparative facts: an improvement of blood pressure levels and an increase in salt intake,” explains Dr. Ohno. “In particular, in hypertensive patients with multiple antihypertensive drugs, salt intake was higher than those taking only one antihypertensive drug.”

Salt intake for healthy people was targeted less than 8 g/day for men and less than 7 g/day for women in Dietary Reference Intakes for Japanese, 2015, published by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare.

“However, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2016 5 reported 10.8 g/day in men, 9.2 g/day in women,” Dr. Ohno says. “More awareness about the harms of higher salt intake is needed in both hypertensive patients and healthy people. We can check the amount of salt in a lot of food and seasoning, such as soy sauce, miso paste, mayonnaise and so on, which are printed on the food labels. It is impossible to measure salt intake in every meal, so all of us should try to take food with reduced salt by referring to food labels.”

Dr. Ohno says that future research should consider whether nutritional guidance can improve the accomplishment rate of the target blood pressure and decrease the number of antihypertensive drug prescriptions.

“As a new attempt, we have explained their estimated salt intake value and gave nutritional guidance including salt, calories and so on to participants since 2017. We think salt restriction is an important modifiable factor of lifestyle to treat and prevent high blood pressure,” he concluded.

To contact our editorial team please email us at editorial@cnsmedia.com

Related Articles

Health & Nutrition News

Claiming concentration? Red Bull cautioned by UK advertising watchdog for “misleading” health claim

17 Jan 2019 --- UK advertising watchdog, the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA), has banned a poster for the energy drink Red Bull for reportedly implying that Red Bull has a beneficial impact on health, in particular, focus and concentration. Suggesting a product aids focus and concentration is a health claim, and therefore must comply with the claims authorized on the EU register. This is According to Regulation (EC) 1924/2006 on nutrition and health claims made on foods. Health claims are defined as those that state, suggest or imply a relationship between a food, or ingredient and health.

Packaging & Technology News

First time for Europe: Spanish supermarket chain launches Nutri-score labeling

16 Jan 2019 --- Spanish supermarket chain Eroski has introduced a handful of own-brand products featuring Nutri-Score labeling. This makes Eroski the first distribution company in Spain to incorporate this “advanced nutrition” labeling. The Nutri-Score system classifies foods into five levels, indicated by colored letters – from “A” in dark green to “E” in dark orange. It is calculated on the basis of the calories, the nutrients which are beneficial for our health – fiber, protein, amount of fruit, vegetables, nuts and pulses – and nutrients whose intake should be reduced – saturated fat, salt and sugar – per 100 grams of the product.

Health & Nutrition News

Unhealthy demographic targeting? Bulk of black and Hispanic teens US food TV advertising budget goes on junk options

15 Jan 2019 --- Of the US$1.1 billion spent on advertising to black and Hispanic teens – via Spanish-language and black-targeted TV programming – over 80 percent was channeled to adverts for fast food restaurants and by food and beverage companies marketing unhealthy food. This is according to a report from the Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity at the University of Connecticut.

Health & Nutrition News

Size matters: BFN launches portion-focused dietary guide

15 Jan 2019 --- A practical guide to navigating food portion sizes by simply using one’s hands or a spoon has been released by the British Nutrition Foundation (BFN). The guide seeks to help consumers understand which foods to eat, how often and in what quantities, to maintain a healthy weight and lifestyle. It is available in three forms, as a fridge poster with an overview of the recommendations, a booklet which expands on how to put the advice into practice and a digital, downloadable guide, with advice on portion sizes for a variety of foods.

Health & Nutrition News

Eating our hearts out? European dietary habits are causing high CVD and premature death levels, study says

14 Jan 2019 --- Nearly half of premature cardiovascular (CVD) deaths in Europe could be prevented by better nutrition. This is the conclusion of a joint study at Germany’s  Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), the Friedrich Schiller University Jena, the nutriCARD competence cluster and the University of Washington, US. Published in the European Journal of Epidemiology, the study calls for policy interventions to increase prevention of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) through better diets and education.

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/news/patients-with-high-blood-pressure-rely-on-medication-over-salt-reduction-study-finds.html