New Research Suggests Probiotics Could Prevent Allergies And Dairy Dust Could Protect Against Asthma

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22 Aug 2016 --- Further allergy research has suggested probiotics could prevent or reduce allergies in children, and that dairy dust found in dairy farms could protect against the development of asthma.

Both pieces of research feature at the International Congress of Immunology, currently being held in Melbourne, Australia.

The probiotic research, presented by Jiri Hrdy from the Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic, showed that decreased allergy incidence was observed 5, 10, 20 years after initial supplementation of newborns with the probiotic Colinfant New Born. 

The researchers looked at the blood of probiotic colonized and of non-colonized children, high-risk children of allergic mothers, and non-colonized children of healthy mothers. They also tested the capacity of immune cells derived from cord blood to protect against allergies if associated with probiotic bacteria. 

The researchers hypothesized that the beneficial effect of probiotics on newborn immature immune system could be, at least partially, explained by effect it has on immune cells. The researchers claim this gives an insight into how babies at risk of allergies due to their family history may be protected against developing allergies later in life through exposure to probiotics as a neonate.

The research into dairy dust and reduced cases of asthma in children is due to be discussed by Professor Hamida Hammad, from the VIB life sciences institute in Belgium.

The research will discuss how children exposed to dust on dairy farms are generally protected against developing allergies and asthma, revealing a genetic mutation in 1500 children who lived on farms that did not have immunity against allergies and asthma. 

The discovery opens the way for a vaccine to prevent asthma, which affects over 330 million people worldwide.

The International Congress of Immunology will continue until the 26th August.

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