High gluten diet during pregnancy could double risk of diabetes in children, study finds

636730305777746932bakery gluten free.jpg

20 Sep 2018 --- A high gluten intake by mothers during pregnancy may be associated with an increased risk of their child developing Type 1 diabetes, a study published in The BMJ suggests.

However, the researchers say that further studies are needed to confirm or rule out these findings before any changes to dietary recommendations could be justified.

Gluten is a general name for the proteins found in wheat, rye, and barley and is suggested to affect the development of Type 1 diabetes. In animal studies, a gluten-free diet during pregnancy almost wholly prevented Type 1 diabetes in offspring, but no intervention study has been undertaken in pregnant women.

To better understand the nature of this association, researchers led by Julie Antvorskov at the Bartholin Institute in Denmark in collaboration with researchers at Denmark's Statens Serum Institut, set out to examine whether gluten intake during pregnancy is associated with subsequent risk of Type 1 diabetes in children.

They analyzed data for 63,529 pregnant women enrolled in the Danish National Birth Cohort between January 1996 and October 2002.

Women reported their diet using a food frequency questionnaire at week 25 of pregnancy and information on Type 1 diabetes in their children was obtained through the Danish Registry of Childhood and Adolescent Diabetes.

Average gluten intake was 13 g/day, ranging from less than 7 g/day to more than 20 g/day, and the researchers identified 247 cases of Type 1 diabetes (a rate of 0.37 percent) among the participants' children.

After taking account of potentially influential factors, such as mother's age, weight (BMI), total energy intake, and smoking during pregnancy, they found that the child's risk of Type 1 diabetes increased proportionally with the mother's gluten intake during pregnancy (per 10 g/day increase).

For example, children of women with the highest gluten intake (20 g/day or more) versus those with the lowest gluten intake (less than 7 g/day) had double the risk of developing Type 1 diabetes over a mean follow-up period of 15.6 years.

However, the researches state that as this is an observational study, no firm conclusions can be drawn about cause and effect.

The mechanisms that might explain this association are not known but could include increased inflammation or increased gut permeability (so-called leakiness of the gut), they write. However, more evidence is needed before changes to dietary recommendations could be justified, they conclude.

In a linked editorial, researchers at the National Institute for Health and Welfare in Finland, say further studies are needed “to identify whether the proposed association is driven by gluten, or by something else in the grains or the diet.”

The authors agree that it is too early to change dietary recommendations on gluten intake in pregnancy, but state that doctors, researchers and the public should be aware of the possible link between gluten and diabetes. However, they must also keep in mind that further studies are needed to confirm or rule out these findings and to explore possible underlying mechanisms.

To contact our editorial team please email us at editorial@cnsmedia.com

Related Articles

Health & Nutrition News

Fasting may improve health and shield against age-related diseases, study finds

17 Jan 2019 --- Fasting intermittently (IF) may reprogram a variety of cellular responses and result in a range of health benefits, according to a US study conducted on mice. Fasting was found to affect circadian clocks in the liver and skeletal muscles, causing them to rewire their metabolism, which may promote health and protect from age-related diseases. The research, published in Cell Reports, opens new pathways of investigation that may lead to the development of nutritional strategies to improve health in humans.

Health & Nutrition News

Low GI options: Holista CollTech and Kawan Food join forces to produce healthier Indian flatbreads

17 Jan 2019 --- Holista CollTech Ltd and Kawan Food Bhd, an exporter of frozen Asian food products, have partnered to produce healthier alternatives to traditional Indian flatbreads, such as roti canai, roti and chapati. The companies hope to tackle Malaysia’s growing obesity problem by offering healthier options to the nation’s staple foods.

Health & Nutrition News

Preventative healthcare buzz: Nuritas and Pharmavite partner on bioactive peptides in supplements

16 Jan 2019 --- Irish biotech company Nuritas and supplement manufacturer Pharmavite have partnered in a bid to “transform” the dietary supplements industry. The partnership will combine Nuritas’ artificial intelligence (AI) technology with Pharmavite’s experience across multiple dosage forms. The news is the latest in a string of high profile partnerships for Nuritas, including BASF and Nestlé, and an indicator of Nuritas’ consumer strategy.  

Health & Nutrition News

A failing strategy? Gestational diabetes risk not lowered through reduced weight gain research finds

15 Jan 2019 --- Conventional ways to prevent gestational diabetes mellitus are ineffective and its appearance possibly depends on each individual’s health, according to a recent Pennington Biomedical study. The results found that moms-to-be who ate healthier and less, and increased their physical activity, developed gestational diabetes at about the same rates as women who didn't follow the same lifestyle. The researchers now believe there may be different types of gestational diabetes that warrant different approaches to treatment and prevention.

Health & Nutrition News

Unhealthy demographic targeting? Bulk of black and Hispanic teens US food TV advertising budget goes on junk options

15 Jan 2019 --- Of the US$1.1 billion spent on advertising to black and Hispanic teens – via Spanish-language and black-targeted TV programming – over 80 percent was channeled to adverts for fast food restaurants and by food and beverage companies marketing unhealthy food. This is according to a report from the Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity at the University of Connecticut.

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/news/high-gluten-diet-during-pregnancy-could-double-risk-of-diabetes-in-children-study-finds.html