Vitamin D Supplementation May Improve Fertility

430e0218-c71c-4834-a829-004b90903518articleimage.jpg

23 May 2017 --- Researchers will today present new data on the link between vitamin D and male fertility at the European Congress of Endocrinology (ECE) in Lisbon. The new results add to our understanding of the effects of low vitamin D levels on testosterone levels and whether vitamin D supplementation could help improve fertility in both sexes.

Vitamin D, a hormone produced by the body through exposure to the sunshine or obtained from foods such as fatty fish and egg yolk, helps the body control calcium and phosphate levels. Previous studies have linked vitamin D levels with a range of health problems including cardiovascular disease and cancer.

Up to 80% of the population in Europe are affected by low vitamin D levels. As this is particularly common amongst people who lead unhealthy, sedentary lifestyles, low vitamin D levels have been associated with obesity; at the same time as obesity is rising, vitamin D levels are falling.

Female fertility and semen quality have deteriorated in the recent years due to largely unknown causes. Infertility rates amongst couples who want to have children are at 10-15%, and up to 10% of women of reproductive age suffer from polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a condition which may hinder fertility.

Dr. Elisabeth Lerchbaum, from the Medical University of Graz, has led much research on the effects of vitamin D supplementation in different aspects of male and female fertility. Research from her group and others suggests vitamin D affects many aspects of fertility in both genders, including influencing production and maturation of sperm cells in men, egg cell and uterine lining maturation in women, and sex hormone production in both sexes. Vitamin D levels have been associated with in-vitro fertilization (IVF) outcome, some features of PCOS and endometriosis in women.  In men, levels of vitamin D have been linked to semen quality and male hormone levels in both fertile and infertile men.

Further studies have shown beneficial effects of vitamin D supplementation in some stages of egg cell maturation and menstrual cycle regulation in women suffering from PCOS. Other findings suggest benefits of vitamin D supplementation in metabolic conditions -such as type-2 diabetes, obesity and metabolic syndrome- in PCOS women.

There is evidence that vitamin D supplementation can improve semen quality, fertility outcomes and testosterone concentrations. Recent studies suggest that vitamin D supplementation could be beneficial for couples undergoing IVF.

Although accumulating evidence from animal and human studies suggests that vitamin D deficiency may have a negative effect on fertility, more research is needed to determine whether it causes it.

“High-quality randomized controlled trials are needed to evaluate how vitamin D supplementation affects fertility and sex hormone production in men and women. There is also an ongoing debate about what the optimal dose of vitamin D levels and supplementation should be,” says Dr. Lechbaum. “Looking at the metabolism of vitamin D could open up new treatment methods.  Vitamin D supplementation might be a safe and affordable treatment option in PCOS or might support couples who want to have children.”

A second large-scale randomized controlled trial in women with and without hormonal imbalances will be finished this year. Depending on the results, the research group will focus on studying optimal vitamin D levels and supplementation dose.

To contact our editorial team please email us at editorial@cnsmedia.com

Related Articles

Health & Nutrition News

A green diet revolution? Calls for radical diet and food production intervention to improve health and the planet

17 Jan 2019 --- Feeding a growing population of 10 billion people by 2050 with a healthy and environmentally friendly diet will be impossible without dramatically transforming the global population’s eating habits, improving food production and reducing food waste. This is according to a Lancet commission of prominent academics that has put forward a planetary health diet.

Health & Nutrition News

Fasting may improve health and shield against age-related diseases, study finds

17 Jan 2019 --- Fasting intermittently (IF) may reprogram a variety of cellular responses and result in a range of health benefits, according to a US study conducted on mice. Fasting was found to affect circadian clocks in the liver and skeletal muscles, causing them to rewire their metabolism, which may promote health and protect from age-related diseases. The research, published in Cell Reports, opens new pathways of investigation that may lead to the development of nutritional strategies to improve health in humans.

Health & Nutrition News

Microbiome holds potential for treating milk allergy, mice study finds

16 Jan 2019 --- Gut microbes from healthy infant donors transplanted into mice prevented allergic reactions to milk, while gut microbes from infant donors with milk allergies failed to do the same, according to a Chicago University study. Supported by the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) and published in Nature Medicine, the study findings suggest that gut microbes can significantly affect allergic responses to foods.

Health & Nutrition News

A failing strategy? Gestational diabetes risk not lowered through reduced weight gain research finds

15 Jan 2019 --- Conventional ways to prevent gestational diabetes mellitus are ineffective and its appearance possibly depends on each individual’s health, according to a recent Pennington Biomedical study. The results found that moms-to-be who ate healthier and less, and increased their physical activity, developed gestational diabetes at about the same rates as women who didn't follow the same lifestyle. The researchers now believe there may be different types of gestational diabetes that warrant different approaches to treatment and prevention.

Health & Nutrition News

Unhealthy demographic targeting? Bulk of black and Hispanic teens US food TV advertising budget goes on junk options

15 Jan 2019 --- Of the US$1.1 billion spent on advertising to black and Hispanic teens – via Spanish-language and black-targeted TV programming – over 80 percent was channeled to adverts for fast food restaurants and by food and beverage companies marketing unhealthy food. This is according to a report from the Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity at the University of Connecticut.

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/news/vitamin-d-supplementation-may-improve-fertility.html