Psoriasis Patients Cite Cutting Alcohol, Taking Omega 3 as Best Ways to Improve Skin

fd13a205-997c-495e-af47-aab0b8ea9febarticleimage.jpg

24 May 2017 --- A US study into common dietary habits, interventions and perceptions among patients with psoriasis has found that reducing alcohol, gluten, nightshades, and adding omega 3, vegetables and oral vitamin D were the most commonly reported dietary interventions leading to improved skin.

The study was based on the results of a 61-question survey administered to the US National Psoriasis Foundation membership. The survey was completed by 1206 psoriasis patients and focused on dietary habits, modifications, skin responses and perceptions.

According to the study, “compared to age- and sex-matched controls, psoriasis patients consumed significantly less sugar, whole grain fiber, dairy, and calcium (p < 0.001), while consuming more fruits, vegetables, and legumes (p < 0.01).” 

Use of dietary modification for improved skin was reported by 86% percent of respondents. The percentage of patients reporting skin improvement was greatest after reducing alcohol (53.8%), gluten (53.4%), nightshades (52.1%), and after adding fish oil/omega-3 (44.6%), vegetables (42.5%) and oral vitamin D (41%).

The researchers also found that certain diets had a positive effect on skin condition. The highest percentage of patients reporting a favorable skin response adhered to the following diets: Pagano (72.2%), vegan (70%) and Paleolithic (68.9%). Improving overall health was a commonly cited motivation for attempting dietary changes (41.8%).

This national survey is among the first to report the dietary behaviors of patients with psoriasis. According to the researchers, the data collected during this study “may benefit patients and clinicians as they discuss the role of diet in managing both psoriasis and associated cardiometabolic comorbidities.”

The study was published in Dermatology and Therapy and is available online

To contact our editorial team please email us at editorial@cnsmedia.com

Related Articles

Health & Nutrition News

Navigating the digestive health space: Probiotic strain specificity and microbiome key to future NPD

16 Nov 2018 --- Emerging science linking a healthy microbiome to nearly every facet of health, as well as the ongoing media reporting on probiotics, have helped drive consumer interest in gut health. This growing area offers a wealth of opportunities to formulators, but due to regulatory demands and increasing consumer scrutiny, a clear view of how to navigate this space is vital.

Health & Nutrition News

Weekly Roundup: DSM enters Japanese partnership on healthy aging, Croda expands with Marine Biotechnology innovation center

16 Nov 2018 --- In nutrition news this week, Croda opened a new Center of Innovation for Marine Biotechnology and DSM entered a collaboration on the development of services in nutritional rehabilitation and disease prevention in Japan. Lonza and Sartorius Stedim Biotech (SSB) are modifying their current agreement for the supply of cell culture media by mutual accord. Lastly, Gelita recently hosted a US symposium called, “The Sounds of Health and Nutrition,” which aimed to offer inspiration for market opportunities in the global health and nutrition marketplace.

Health & Nutrition News

Kellogg’s debuts gut-boosting cereal with prebiotics, probiotics and fiber

15 Nov 2018 --- Kellogg’s has launched a “3-in-1” cereal aimed at making digestive wellness support easily accessible in food. The new wellness brand HI! Happy Inside delivers prebiotics, probiotics and fiber in an all-in-one cereal. The launch comes at a time when interest in digestive health seems to only continue to grow.

Health & Nutrition News

Deep sea dinners? Future global food source may lie in cephalopods, study says

15 Nov 2018 --- As the world’s population continues to expand and worries over strained global food resources grow, a recent article published in Frontiers is highlighting how cephalopods – squid, octopus and cuttlefish – could hold promise for our nutritional future. Under the initiative CephsInAction, the article calls for the use of the cephalopod population as a growing source of protein and a counterweight to the pressures facing global fisheries.

Health & Nutrition News

Cranberries found to reduce negative effects of animal-based diet on gut health

15 Nov 2018 --- A Cranberry Institute and USDA-funded study into the potential protective effects of cranberries on the gut microbiome has found that adding cranberries to a meat-based diet can reduce the rise in secondary gut bile acids that have been associated with colon and GI cancer. The feeding trial – published in The Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry – found that the addition of whole cranberry powder to this common diet lessened potentially carcinogenic secondary bile acids and blunted the decline in beneficial short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract.

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/news/psoriasis-patients-cite-cutting-alcohol-taking-omega-3-as-best-ways-to-improve-skin.html