Study: Moderate Coffee Consumption May Reduce Risk of Type 2 Diabetes by 25 Percent

14 Nov 2013 --- Regular, moderate coffee consumption may decrease an individual's risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to research highlighted in a report published by the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC).

More than 370 million people worldwide have diabetes making it one of the most significant health problems(1). To mark World Diabetes Day, ISIC has published an updated report outlining the latest research on coffee and type 2 diabetes.

Key research findings include:
- Epidemiological evidence shows that drinking three to four cups of coffee per day is associated with an approximate 25% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes, compared to consuming none or less than two cups per day(2,3)
- Research has also suggested an inverse dose response, with each additional cup of coffee reducing the relative risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 7-8 per cent(2,3).
- Caffeine is unlikely to be responsible for the protective effects of coffee, as one study(4) suggested that both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee are associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes
- Recent work(5) showed an advantage of filtered coffee over boiled, decaffeinated coffee over caffeinated coffee and a stronger inverse correlation in those under 60 years age group
- Another study(6) shows that regular but not decaffeinated coffee was much more protective against type 2 diabetes in women of all ethnic groups than in men

The report also puts forward some of the key mechanistic theories that underlie the possible relationship between coffee consumption and the reduced risk of diabetes. These includes the 'Energy Expenditure Hypothesis', which suggests that the caffeine in coffee stimulates metabolism and increases energy expenditure and the 'Carbohydrate Metabolic Hypothesis', whereby it is thought that coffee components play a key role by influencing the glucose balance within the body.

There is also a subset of theories that suggest coffee contains components that may improve insulin sensitivity though mechanisms such as modulating inflammatory pathways, mediating the oxidative stress of cells, hormonal effects or by reducing iron stores.

The updated report is based on a report from the World Congress on Prevention of Diabetes, held in 2012 and is updated with the latest research from this field published over the past year. Please contact us for the full summary.

To contact our editorial team please email us at editorial@cnsmedia.com

Related Articles

Nutrition & Health News

Plant-based possibilities: Report details novel sugar replacements for beverages

19 Apr 2018 --- PreScouter, a Chicago based technology scouting company, details novel replacements for sugars in a new analysis, that are from natural sources, safe, technologically viable and environmentally stable, for use in beverages. The company hopes that the report answers consumer calls for sweeteners that are both natural and healthy, in light of diabetes and obesity epidemics, and that it may aid informing beverage providers on how to best respond to calls for lowering sugar levels in drinks.

Nutrition & Health News

Beneo's functional carbohydrate gains Argentinian approval 

16 Apr 2018 --- Beneo’s Palatinose functional carbohydrate (isomaltulose) has been approved for use in all food and drink categories in Argentina, the company has reported. Palatinose is naturally-sourced and delivers full carbohydrate energy (4kcal/g) in a more balanced way, due to a slower and more sustained uptake. This results in higher fat oxidation and a low glycemic effect which can aid diet-related problems such as obesity and diabetes.

Nutrition & Health News

Mediterranean diet found to boost gut microbial diversity and reduce hospitalization in liver cirrhosis

13 Apr 2018 --- Following a Mediterranean-style diet, boosted with a good amount of vegetables and fermented milk products such as yogurt, along with coffee and tea, is linked to greater gut microbial diversity and a lower risk of hospitalization in patients with liver cirrhosis, according to a study presented at The International Liver Congress 2018 in Paris, France. 

Nutrition & Health News

Can you be obese yet healthy? Individual focus must prevail in disease prevention, says study

12 Apr 2018 --- Researchers have called for the end to the term “healthy obesity” has been voiced, due to its apparent misleading and flawed meaning. Dr. William Johnson, from the School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences at Loughborough University, has emphasized that further research must be conducted to understand the differences between individuals who hold the same BMI, but suffer from different health afflictions. Essentially, this could lead to the development of more stratified disease prevention and intervention efforts that are targeted at individuals.

Nutrition & Health News

Cold pressed collaboration: Taiyo succeeds in chia oil shelf-life extension

11 Apr 2018 --- Taiyo, an expert manufacturer of functional ingredients, offers Xia Oil, a premium chia oil, that remains stable for up to two years. Using a novel process, XIA PURE Ox Blocker technology, the taste and smell of the oil stay fresh and its nutraceutical properties remain intact. 

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/news/Study-Moderate-Coffee-Consumption-May-Reduce-Risk-of-Type-2-Diabetes-by-25-Percent.html