Study finds tomato-rich diet cuts skin cancer risk in half

97786c36-facc-4c1e-ae12-b7e01334141farticleimage.jpg

14 Jul 2017 --- Research involving mice that were fed a tomato-rich diet on a daily basis showed a reduction in the development of skin cancer tumors, by up to half in some cases.

The new study at Ohio State University shows how nutritional interventions can alter the risk for skin cancers. It has been published online in the journal Scientific Reports.

It found that male mice fed a diet of 10 percent tomato powder daily for 35 weeks, then exposed to ultraviolet light, experienced, on average, a 50 percent decrease in skin cancer tumors compared to mice that did not eat dehydrated tomato.

The theory behind the relationship between tomatoes and cancer is that dietary carotenoids, the pigmenting compounds that give tomatoes their color, may protect skin against UV light damage, says Jessica Cooperstone, co-author of the study and a research scientist in the Department of Food Science and Technology in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at Ohio State.

There were no significant differences in tumor numbers for the female mice in the study. Previous research has shown that male mice develop tumors earlier after UV exposure and that their tumors are more numerous, larger and more aggressive.

“This study showed us that we do need to consider sex when exploring different preventive strategies,” says the study's senior author, Tatiana Oberyszyn, a professor of pathology and member of Ohio State's Comprehensive Cancer Center.

“What works in men may not always work equally well in women and vice versa.”   

There has been much work carried out previously directed towards tomato consumption and various health benefits. 

Previous human clinical trials suggest that eating tomato paste over time can dampen sunburns, perhaps thanks to carotenoids from the plants that are deposited in the skin of humans after eating, and may be able to protect against UV light damage, Cooperstone says.

“Lycopene, the primary carotenoid in tomatoes, has been shown to be the most effective antioxidant of these pigments,” Professor Oberyszyn adds.

“However, when comparing lycopene administered from a whole food (tomato) or a synthesized supplement, tomatoes appear more effective in preventing redness after UV exposure, suggesting other compounds in tomatoes may also be at play.”

Male VS Female Results 
In the new study, the Ohio State researchers found that only male mice fed dehydrated red tomatoes had reductions in tumor growth. Those fed diets with tangerine tomatoes, which have been shown to be higher in bioavailable lycopene in previous research, had fewer tumors than the control group, but the difference was not statistically significant.

Cooperstone is currently researching tomato compounds other than lycopene that may impart health benefits.

Non-melanoma skin cancers are the most common of all cancers, with more new cases (5.4 million in 2012) each year than breast, prostate, lung and colon cancers combined, according to the American Cancer Society.

Despite a low mortality rate, these cancers are costly, disfiguring, and their rates are increasing, according to the US Department of Health and Human Services.

“Alternative methods for systemic protection, possibly through nutritional interventions to modulate risk for skin-related diseases, could provide a significant benefit,” Cooperstone says.

“Foods are not drugs, but they can possibly, over the lifetime of consumption, alter the development of certain diseases,” she says.

This was a three-year study that was supported by the National Institutes of Health through the National Cancer Institute. 

To contact our editorial team please email us at editorial@cnsmedia.com

Related Articles

Packaging & Technology News

“BPA-free” plastic can still cause harm to mice – and maybe humans, researchers warn 

20 Sep 2018 --- Bisphenol A (BPA) alternatives used in “BPA-free” bottles, cups, cages and other items have been found to cause reproductive problems in mice by researchers at Washington State University. “BPA-free” or not, plastic products that show signs of damage or aging cannot be considered safe, the researchers warn. Patricia Hunt, a researcher in the lab, further tells PackagingInsights that it is not possible for consumers to determine if a product contains bisphenols, but states that “new recycling codes or other mandatory labeling that would allow consumers to make educated decisions would be ideal.”

Health & Nutrition News

A diet consisting of foods with low nutritional quality ratings linked to cancer risk in European study

19 Sep 2018 --- The consumption of foods with relatively low nutritional quality has been linked to an increased risk of developing cancer, according to a study published this week in PLOS Medicine. The researchers used the British Food Standards Agency nutrient profiling system (FSAm-NPS) to reach their conclusions. The study was conducted by Mélanie Deschasaux of the French National Institute for Health and Medical Research, France and colleagues, in association with the WHO-IARC, suggests broad potential for the use of FSAm-NPS-based package labeling (e.g. Nutri-Score) to promote healthy food choices in European settings.

Health & Nutrition News

Early life microbiome health may have lasting effect on ability to fight disease, study finds

19 Sep 2018 --- The first bacteria introduced into the gut during infanthood may have a lasting impact on an individual’s long-term ability to fight chronic disease, findings from the University of Alberta have suggested. The findings could pave the way for treatments that could adjust microbiomes in infants right after birth to help ward off serious chronic diseases. Poor gut health has been linked to obesity, Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, inflammatory bowel disease, colon cancer, neurological disorders, autism and allergies.

Health & Nutrition News

ASEAN health and wellness boom spurs Australian innovation potential: CSIRO and KPMG

18 Sep 2018 --- The ASEAN region’s growth prospects and market conditions, coupled with an increased interest in health & wellness, have created a fertile ground for Australian food innovators and companies to do business in the region, according to a report by Australia’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) and professional service company KPMG.

Health & Nutrition News

Aurora Cannabis stocks rise as Coca-Cola eyes CBD infused drinks

18 Sep 2018 --- Coca-Cola is eyeing CBD-infused drink options as consumer interest in marijuana products grows and regulatory changes make this segment increasingly viable for diverse new product development. The beverage company is reportedly working with Aurora Cannabis, a Canadian medical marijuana producer and distributor. Following Bloomberg’s report on the companies' collaboration, Aurora’s shares jumped by 23 percent on Monday in New York to US$8.

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/news/study-finds-tomato-rich-diet-cuts-skin-cancer-risk-in-half.html