Study Shows Probiotic to Increase Vitamin D Levels

dairy products web.jpg

20 June 2013 --- A study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism is the first report of an oral probiotic supplement significantly increasing circulating vitamin D levels in the blood. The lead author on the study, Mitchell Jones, MD, PhD, received the Early Career Investigator Poster Presentation Prize from the New York Academy of Sciences and the Sackler Institute for Nutrition Science at last week's Probiotics, Prebiotics, and the Host Microbiome: The Science of Translation conference in New York City(1).

The study(2) , a post-hoc analysis of a published randomized controlled trial, examined the effect of Lactobacillus reuteri NCIMB 30242 on fat-soluble vitamins. It showed that L. reuteri NCIMB 30242 increased circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels by 25.5 percent in hypercholesterolemic adults over the nine-week intervention. 
 
According to the National Institutes of Health, serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D is the best indicator of vitamin D status, and is important for adequate bone and overall health in healthy individuals(3). More than 40 million adults in the United States have – or are at risk of – developing osteoporosis, a disease most often associated with inadequate calcium intake. Insufficient vitamin D contributes to osteoporosis by reducing calcium absorption(4) . Researchers continue to study other possible health effects of vitamin D, such as protection against heart disease, autoimmune diseases, and diabetes. 
 
The Institute of Medicine recommends 600 IUs of vitamin D daily to meet the needs of almost everyone in the United States and Canada. Most people get vitamin D through sun exposure, foods that contain it, and supplements. A variety of factors may reduce vitamin D absorption, including limited exposure to sunlight, dark skin, obesity, and problems with absorption or ability to convert vitamin D to its active form. 
 
"This study, part of an ongoing line of research in bile metabolism and Western disease, is adding to the body of knowledge on the microbiome and its role in human health," said Dr. Jones, lead study author and chief scientific officer, Micropharma Limited. "Although it has long been known that the gastrointestinal tract plays an active role in the absorption of vitamin D, these findings showing improved vitamin D status in response to an orally delivered probiotic are a first, and will inform the development of new products that may be beneficial for people with low vitamin D levels."
 
Previous studies have shown the effect of L. reuteri NCIMB 30242 on cholesterol reduction, but its effect on the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins was unknown. 
 
"The vitamin D market has grown by 20 percent a year over the last 10 years, and within this timeframe, U.S. medical costs around osteoporosis and fractures in an aging population were already estimated at $22 billion(5)," said Ryan Jones, Micropharma's chief executive officer. "As a pioneer in research and innovation on products that work naturally through the microbiome to impact health outcomes, we are very encouraged about the potential for these vitamin D findings for public health."
 
References: 
1. Jones, M. Modulation of the microbiome with L. reuteri NCIMB 30242 reduces cholesterol, inflammatory markers and increases 25(OH) vitamin D. Poster session presented at: Probiotics, Prebiotics, and the Host Microbiome: The Science of Translation. 2013 June 12; New York, NY. 
2. Jones ML, Martoni CJ, Prakash S. Oral Supplementation with probiotic L. reuteri NCIMB 30242 increases mean circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D: a post-hoc analysis of a randomized control trial. J Clin Endocrin Meab. First published ahead of print April 22, 2013. 
3. Office of Dietary Supplements. National Institutes of Health. http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminD-HealthProfessional/ Viewed on 4/24/13 
4. National Institutes of Health Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases National Research Center. Osteoporosis overview. October 2010. 
5. Blume SQ, Curtis JR. Medical Costs of osteoporosis in the elderly Medicare population. Osteoporos Int. 2011 Jun;22(6):1835-44. doi: 10.1007/s00198-010-1419-7. Epub 2010 Dec 17.
 

To contact our editorial team please email us at editorial@cnsmedia.com

Related Articles

Health & Nutrition News

DuPont Nutrition & Health synbiotic touted to reduce health risks linked to obesity

14 Dec 2018 --- DuPont Nutrition & Health’s Howaru Shape synbiotic may help reduce health risks for overweight consumers, according to a recent clinical study on synbiotic dietary supplements. Howaru Shape combines the benefits of a probiotic with prebiotic fiber and is touted as capable of improving metabolic health and promoting weight loss.

Health & Nutrition News

GutGuide: Affordable gut testing for personalized nutrition

11 Dec 2018 --- With the rise of personalized nutrition and the growing interest in gut health has come an array of personalized gut testing services. In this space, Finnish company GutGuide is seeking to offer reasonably-priced, patient-specific treatment and supplementation to a variety of afflictions connected to the gut, based on the company’s research into oral and gut microbiota. The role for a good functioning microbiota in skin health will be the next platform for the technology.

Food Ingredients News

2019 healthy NPD trends: Digestive health and personalization among Kerry Health and Nutrition Institute predictions

10 Dec 2018 --- The Kerry Health and Nutrition Institute (KHNI) has highlighted its perspective on the top ten forthcoming nutrition trends that we can expect to see in 2019, including authenticity & provenance, digestive wellness and sugar targets. The trends symbolize awareness around products, new ingredients which are backed by emerging science and public health recommendations which are driving the reduction in sugar content of foods across all categories, according to KHNI.

Health & Nutrition News

New research links gut microbiome to ethnicity

07 Dec 2018 --- The gut microbiome is closely linked to overall health and may vary according to ethnicity, joint research between Vanderbilt University, Tennessee, and the University of Minnesota, US, has found. However, the researchers point out that although foods and supplements that target the microbiome are currently gaining popularity, more research is needed to pinpoint what exactly constitutes a healthy gut microbiome.

Food Research

Diana eyes synbiotic opportunities: Symrise Nutrition Division to assess polyphenol and probiotic synergies

04 Dec 2018 --- Diana, the Nutrition Division of Symrise, is eyeing the potential of fusing fruit and vegetable polyphenols with probiotic strains from the company’s Probi business for the creation of synbiotic ingredients. One of the key platforms for a new research project will be assessing the potential for optimal gut health products that combine Probi strains such as LP299V with prebiotics.

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/headlines/Study-Shows-Probiotic-to-Increase-Vitamin-D-Levels.html