Wild Blueberry Could Help Prevent Gum Disease

635768692293986478flavors6.jpg

03 Sept 2015 --- Gum disease is a common condition among adults that occurs when bacteria form biofilms or plaques on teeth, and consequently the gums become inflamed. Some severe cases, called periodontitis, call for antibiotics. But now scientists have discovered that wild blueberry extract could help prevent dental plaque formation. Their report in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry could lead to a new therapy for periodontitis and a reduced need for antibiotics.

Many people have had some degree of gum inflammation, or gingivitis, caused by dental plaque. The gums get red and swollen, and they bleed easily. If left unchecked, the condition can progress to periodontitis. The plaque hardens into tartar, and the infection can spread below the gum line and destroy the tissue supporting the teeth. To treat this condition, dentists scrape off the tartar and sometimes have to resort to conventional antibiotics. But recently, researchers have started looking at natural antibacterial compounds to treat gum disease. Daniel Grenier and colleagues wanted to see if blueberry polyphenols, which work against foodborne pathogens, could also help fight Fusobacterium nucleatum, one of the main species of bacteria associated with periodontitis.

In the lab, the researchers tested extracts from the wild lowbush blueberry, Vaccinium angustifolium Ait., against F. nucleatum. The polyphenol-rich extracts successfully inhibited the growth of F. nucleatum, as well as its ability to form biofilms. It also blocked a molecular pathway involved in inflammation, a key part of gum disease. The researchers say they're developing an oral device that could slowly release the extract after deep cleaning to help treat periodontitis.

To contact our editorial team please email us at editorial@cnsmedia.com

Related Articles

Health & Nutrition News

Molecular switch may serve as new target point for obesity and diabetes therapies, says study

16 Aug 2018 --- A mechanism of the PI3KC2A kinase enzyme may have significance for the future development of therapies against cancer, obesity and diabetes, research published in Molecular Cell has found. The study highlights how if specific signaling cascades are misregulated, diseases and metabolic disorders may occur. The identified mechanism may have a crucial influence on such signaling cascades.

Health & Nutrition News

Microbe colonization study could inspire better probiotics, claim researchers

13 Aug 2018 --- A novel approach to identify the genes that may be important to help microbes live successfully in the human gut has been identified by a study published in PLOS Computational Biology. The approach utilizes a technique called phylogenetic linear modeling, which has often been used in ecology, but rarely in genomics. The researchers hope that the findings could be important for the development of new therapies to maintain or improve gut health, such as the design of better probiotics.

Business News

Prebiotic, aloe-infused water targets electronic music festival marketing boost

09 Aug 2018 ---Detoxwater, the prebiotic, aloe-infused water brand has announced its partnership as the exclusive enhanced bottled water for the 10th Annual Electric Zoo electronic music festival to be held in Randall’s Island Park this upcoming Labor Day in New York. 

Health & Nutrition News

Montmorency tart cherries may help enhance gut health, finds small scale study

07 Aug 2018 --- Montmorency tart cherries may play a role in improving gut health, suggests a first-of-its-kind human trial of nine adults combined with a parallel laboratory study published in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry. An international team of scientists found that Montmorency tart cherries helped to positively impact the gut microbiome – a collection of trillions of bacteria and other microbes that live in the intestinal tract. The study has been highlighted by the trade association The Cherry Marketing Institute.

Health & Nutrition News

Crickets can be good for the gut, claims new clinical trial

06 Aug 2018 --- Consuming crickets can help support the growth of beneficial gut bacteria and eating crickets is not only safe at high doses but may also reduce inflammation in the body, according to new research. "There is a lot of interest right now in edible insects," says lead author Valerie Stull. "It's gaining traction in Europe and in the U.S. as a sustainable, environmentally friendly protein source compared to traditional livestock."

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/news/wild-blueberry-could-help-prevent-gum-disease.html