Substance found in coffee could help to delay onset of Type 2 diabetes

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08 Sep 2017 --- Scientists have reported that a previously untested compound in coffee seems to improve cell function and insulin sensitivity in laboratory mice. The findings, which appear in a study in the American Chemical Society’s (ACS) Journal of Natural Products, could spur the development of new drugs to treat or even prevent Type 2 diabetes. In recent years, researchers have identified substances in coffee that could help to deal with the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, a disease that nearly 30 million Americans suffer from. But few of these have been tested in animals.

Some studies suggest that drinking three to four cups of coffee a day can reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, according to an ACS press release. Initially, scientists suspected that caffeine was responsible for this effect. But later findings discounted this possibility, suggesting that other substances in coffee may have a more important role.

New study shows compound’s value
In a previous laboratory study, Fredrik Brustad Mellbye, Søren Gregersen and colleagues found that a compound in coffee called cafestol increased insulin secretion in pancreatic cells when they were exposed to glucose. Cafestol also increased glucose uptake in muscle cells just as effectively as a commonly prescribed antidiabetic drug. In the new study, the researchers wanted to see if cafestol would help prevent or delay the onset of Type 2 diabetes in mice.

The researchers divided mice that are prone to develop Type 2 diabetes into three groups. Two of the groups were fed differing doses of cafestol. After 10 weeks, both sets of cafestol-fed mice had lower blood glucose levels and improved insulin secretory capacity compared to a control group that was not given the compound. Cafestol also didn't result in hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, a possible side effect of some antidiabetic medications.

The researchers conclude that daily consumption of cafestol can delay the onset of Type 2 diabetes in these mice, and that it is a good candidate for drug development to treat or prevent the disease in humans.

The authors acknowledge funding from Aarhus University, and the abstract that accompanies this study is available here

The health benefits of coffee have been widely reported in the news. Recently, four cups of coffee a day have been associated with lower risk of all-cause mortality and a multinational study has found that coffee drinkers may live longer. Drinking a few cups of tea or coffee a day has also been linked with preventing liver fibrosis

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