Study shows positive impact of DuPont Danisco Litesse Polydextrose carbohydrate on microbiome

59fd52d9-54b7-453a-8d8b-69959daa1776articleimage.jpg

09 Nov 2017 --- The findings of a DuPont Nutrition & Health research study show that DuPont Danisco Litesse Ultra polydextrose alters the gut microbiome and reduces fasting triglyceride and total cholesterol plasma levels in mice being fed a Western diet. The study is a continuation of the microbiome research work DuPont Nutrition & Health is doing in conjunction with the University of Oulu Medical School in Finland.

DuPont points out that it has a long history in researching the gut microbiome: for close to two decades, the company’s scientists have been researching the gut microbiome and developing products that can boost its health. More than 80 percent of the human body’s immune system can be found in the gut along with effects on skin, metabolic and even brain health, DuPont notes.

“As a global science company, DuPont has been investing for many years in numerous scientific studies,” Michael Bond, Global Product Director, DuPont Nutrition & Health, tells NutritionInsight. “This study is the latest in a catalogue of more than 70 scientific studies of this ingredient, predominately focused on gut health and the area of weight management. As our understanding increases of the overall interconnectivity within the microbiome, more focused clinical research studies will emerge.”

Litesse polydextrose is described as a low calorie, low glycemic, specialty carbohydrate with prebiotic properties that is widely recognized as a fiber. The intake of increased dietary fiber and unsaturated fats are cited as being among the options frequently recommended to address cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and dyslipidemia or the elevation of plasma cholesterol and triglycerides in the bloodstream.

“Litesse Polydextrose can be found in numerous food, beverage and dietary supplement applications globally in part as it is easy to use within formulations,” adds Bond.

Favorable changes
The research showed that mice fed Litesse polydextrose experienced favorable metabolic changes, including decreases in plasma triglycerides and cholesterol, and specific changes in the gut microbiota and gene expression in the gastrointestinal tract.

In the study, Litesse polydextrose was shown to increase microbial groups associated with the lean phenotype and improved lipid metabolism. The mice that were fed Litesse polydextrose had increased Bifidobacterium and Allobaculum genera, which are, according to literature, typically decreased in mice fed a high-fat diet, DuPont notes.

“This study exemplifies DuPont’s commitment to in-depth and long-term science behind our products,” says Heli Putaala, Ph.D., DuPont Nutrition & Health, Global Health and Nutrition Science. “This study with Litesse polydextrose is an example of the type of research we have been performing in our Research Center in Finland for almost 20 years, using our own technologies and expertise in the areas of gut modelling, preclinical and clinical trials.”

“We are now starting to better understand how our product functions by modulating gut microbiota. This regulates microbial metabolites that ultimately have systemic, whole-body effects,” Putaala adds.

Among the study’s other key findings was the discovery that Litesse polydextrose decreased food intake, epididymal fat, plasma triglycerides and total cholesterol in the mice. Furthermore, results showed that Litesse polydextrose changed intestinal gene expression, which may partly explain the favorable metabolic responses.

“While this study was conducted on mice, some human results are in line with what we discovered, although in humans the mechanisms are not yet as clear,” says Professor Karl-Heinz Herzig, who was one of the lead investigators in the study. “These results are very encouraging and should be followed up in human trials.”

By Paul Creasy

Related Articles

Nutrition & Health News

Mood food: Diet differentially affects mental health in young and mature adults

12 Dec 2017 --- Diet and dietary practices have a differential effect on mental health in young adults versus older adults, according to research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. The researchers involved have found that young adults appear to be dependent on food that increases availability of neurotransmitter precursors and concentrations in the brain (meat), while the mood in mature adults (over 30 years) may be more reliant on food that increases availability of antioxidants (fruits) and abstinence of food that inappropriately activates the sympathetic nervous system (coffee, high glycemic index and skipping breakfast).

Business News

New Biopolis probiotic mix helps reduce topical steroid use by atopic dermatitis patients

07 Dec 2017 --- Biopolis, majority owned by agricultural processor and food ingredient provider Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM), has introduced a new probiotic mix designed to reduce the need for topical steroid use by Atopic Dermatitis (AD) patients. The clinical research recently published in JAMA Dermatology, an international peer-reviewed general medical journal, shows the benefits of consuming a mix of probiotics in reducing the need for topical steroids by AD patients.

Business News

High PUFA levels in children linked to reduced allergy risk

07 Dec 2017 --- High levels of omega 3 and omega 6 polyunsaturated fatty acids in children’s blood are associated with a reduced risk of asthma or rhinitis at the age of 16 years, according to new research from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden. The study is published in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Nutrition & Health News

Ingredion carbohydrate shows positive glycemic response and energy release results

06 Dec 2017 --- Ingredient solutions provider Ingredion Incorporated has announced the results of a new clinical study into the sustained energy effects of the Sustra 2434 slowly digestible carbohydrate. The study, published in the peer-reviewed scientific journal Nutrients, is the first to characterize physiological responses to the slowly digestible starch (SDS) in two different foods and found that it lowers glycemic response and produces a steadier energy release.

Business News

Exercise changes gut microbiota independent of diet, researchers report

05 Dec 2017 --- Exercise alone can change the composition of microbes in the gut, according to two studies – one in mice and the other in human subjects. The studies, which offer the first definitive evidence of the hypothesis, were designed to isolate exercise-induced changes from other factors – such as diet or antibiotic use – that might alter the intestinal microbiota.

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/news/study-shows-positive-impact-of-dupont-danisco-litesse-polydextrose-carbohydrate-on-microbiome.html