Studies shed light on negative effects of excess weight on arthritis patients

ca52ee7e-6e9d-4c75-82d8-64485d4e4641articleimage.jpg

04 Dec 2017 --- New research provides insights on the potential negative effects of overweight and obesity on the health of individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A study published in Arthritis Care & Research examines how overweight and obesity may negatively affect the likelihood of achieving remission in early RA. A separate study in Arthritis & Rheumatology focuses on weight change in early RA and patients’ subsequent risk of early death.

Research has suggested that weight may influence the effectiveness of RA therapies. In an Arthritis Care & Research study, Susan Goodman, M.D., of the Hospital for Special Surgery and Weill Cornell Medical School, and her colleagues investigated the potential impact of weight on the likelihood that patients would achieve remission in the early years after an RA diagnosis.

Determining weight’s effect on outcomes
The team examined data from the Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort, a multicenter observational trial of patients with early RA who were treated by rheumatologists using guideline-based care.

“Our study looks at people with recently diagnosed, early RA, who should have the best outcomes and best responses to treatment, and sees how many are either overweight or obese, and then determines if those who are overweight or obese have worse outcomes than those with healthy weight,” says Dr. Goodman.

Of 982 patients, 32 percent had a healthy BMI, 35 percent were overweight and 33 percent were obese. Within three years, 36 percent of patients experienced sustained remission. Compared with patients with a healthy BMI, those who were overweight were 25 percent less likely to experience sustained remission, and those who were obese were 47 percent less likely to do so, despite receiving similar treatments.

The research represents the largest study demonstrating the negative impact of excess weight on the RA disease activity and supports a call to action to better identify and address this risk in patients.

“These findings have important implications for clinical care since rates of overweight and obesity continue to rise,” says Dr. Goodman. “Our findings highlight the high proportion of newly diagnosed RA patients who are overweight or obese and who may have disease that is harder to treat. For people with RA who haven’t had an adequate response to treatment, this may be another factor to consider.”

“Obesity paradox”
In other studies, obesity has been associated with a decreased risk of early death; however, follow-up studies suggest that this “obesity paradox” may be explained by unintentional weight loss in the few years preceding death, rather than a truly protective effect of obesity. According to this explanation, patients with longstanding RA who reached normal or underweight BMI have higher observed mortality and are relatively less healthy than RA patients who maintained obesity or overweight.

To investigate the issue, Jeffrey Sparks, M.D., of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, and his colleagues evaluated the effect of weight change in the early stages of RA on subsequent mortality risk. Their Arthritis & Rheumatology study included 902 women diagnosed with RA in the Nurses’ Health Study and 7,884 matched women without RA.

Women with RA had higher mortality rates than women without RA. Among women with RA, 41 percent died during an average follow-up of 17.0 years after the early RA period; among women without RA, 29.2 percent died during an average follow-up of 18.4 years. In both groups, women who had severe weight loss (>30 pounds) had the highest mortality rates after the early RA period. Weight gain in the early RA period was not associated with mortality for either group.

“Our study is the first to focus on weight change around RA diagnosis and risk of death, rather than weight change in patients who had RA for many years, as in previous studies,” says Dr. Sparks. “Our findings provide evidence that the results of earlier studies – that patients who had normal weights were at higher risk of death – may have been related to unintended weight loss as opposed to a protective effect of being overweight or obese.”

“Our results demonstrate that these prior findings were less likely to be directly related to RA and were likely a phenomenon of frailty and aging of the general population,” Dr. Sparks adds.

To contact our editorial team please email us at editorial@cnsmedia.com

Related Articles

Nutrition & Health News

Targeting aching joints: A key theme at Vitafoods Europe 2018

21 May 2018 --- World populations are getting older and with age, the risk of bone and joint health issues – such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis – increases. Moreover, joint health concerns also affect younger consumers, such as so-called “weekend warriors,” who exercise once or twice a week, meaning that the joint health market is of interest not just to senior citizens but also to any consumers seeking to live an active life. Among the different innovative healthy aging and lifestyle solutions presented at Vitafoods Europe this year, there was a clear spot for ingredients aimed at supporting joint health.

Nutrition & Health News

Weekly Digest: Valensa's Saw Palmetto gains sustainable logo

18 May 2018 --- The past week saw Valensa International gain sustainable recognition with the Fresh from Florida logo for their Saw Palmetto product, as well as USP’s (United States Pharmacopeia) Dietary Supplement Verification Program nabbing the top spot for reliability as determined by pharmacists in a survey conducted by the Pharmacy Times. Furthermore, in clinical news, omega 3 and omega 6 were found to aid the regulation of blood glucose levels in rats. The findings open up the potential for the use of supplements in type 2 diabetes regulation.

Nutrition & Health News

Protein provides benefit for adult bone and joint health, expert consensus reports

17 May 2018 --- Dietary protein intake above the recommended levels may help reduce bone loss and fracture risk in seniors with osteoporosis, an expert consensus reports. Based on an analysis of major research studies, the review, published in Osteoporosis International, found that a protein-rich diet is beneficial for adult bone health. The consensus debunks the popular myth that too much protein may be damaging to bone health.

Nutrition & Health News

Calories from sugar-sweetened drinks deemed most harmful, review finds

16 May 2018 --- A group of scientists have agreed that sugar-sweetened beverages play a unique role in chronic health problems, elevating their calorie status to more harmful than calories from other foods and drinks. The conclusions come from a position paper, published in Obesity Review, compiled by a group of researchers. Also highlighted in the paper was the overall difficulty in conducting and interpreting nutritional research. 

Nutrition & Health News

Vitamin D may play a role in children's non-alcoholic liver disease, study finds

15 May 2018 --- Children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) have particularly low vitamin D status and suffer from vitamin D insufficiency throughout the year, new research has found. The research, published in Pediatric Obesity, charted vitamin D levels and variations in genes that determine vitamin D status, in British children diagnosed with the liver disease. The findings open up potential future possibilities for treatment using vitamin D.

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/news/studies-shed-light-on-negative-effects-of-excess-weight-on-arthritis-patients.html