Risk of heart disease in “food deserts” linked to income, rather than access to healthy food

13c65795-d8e6-43ab-a82a-81bd22a03f6darticleimage.jpg

14 Sep 2017 --- Cardiovascular disease risk is higher in people with a low income or who live in low-income neighborhoods regardless of their access to healthy food. This is according to new research published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

The study, conducted by Emory University School of Medicine, focused on the effects of income, education and socioeconomic status on healthy people living in urban food deserts in the Atlanta metropolitan area. A food desert is defined by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) as a location with both low access to healthy food and low income. Areas with low access to healthy foods are defined as areas where a significant share of people live a mile or more away in urban areas or 10 miles or more away in rural areas from a supermarket, supercenter or large grocery store. According to USDA estimates, 23.5 million people live in food deserts across the US.

The researchers analyzed data from 1,421 subjects who ranged in age from 20 to 70 years. The average age was 49.4 years. Moreover, 38.5 percent were male and 36.6 percent were Black. The researchers studied demographic data, metabolic profiles and early signs of cardiovascular disease, including markers for inflammation and stiffness of the arteries, an early indicator of blood vessel disease. 

People living in food deserts (13.2 percent) were found to have higher rates of smoking, a higher prevalence of high blood pressure and higher body mass index, as well as increased arterial stiffness, compared to those not living in food deserts.

The researchers then analyzed these risk factors with respect to the average neighborhood income and individual income. People living in food deserts in low-income areas had no significant difference in the studied markers for heart disease compared to people living in areas with low income and good food access. 

People with high individual income who lived in low-income areas had lower cardiovascular risk and inflammation compared to people with lower individual income who lived in a similar area. Moreover, people with high individual income who lived in an area with poor food access had a better cardiovascular profile than those with lower individual income who lived in a similar area. 

Overall, personal income appeared to be the most important driver of cardiovascular disease risk.

“At least in the urban environment, the definition of a food desert wasn't sufficient to explain poor health in terms of cardiovascular risk factors,” said senior author Arshed A. Quyyumi, M.D., FACC, FRCP, a professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine and co-director of the Emory Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute.

Related Articles

Nutrition & Health News

Naturex targets oral care market with microbiota-balancing natural active

22 Feb 2018 --- Naturex has launched Bucovia, a natural bio-guided fractionated active aimed at effectively supporting mouth health. Current oral healthcare solutions include biocides (antiseptic or antibiotic), synthetic ingredients that wipe out both good and bad mouth bacteria and increase the virulence of Candida. Naturex’s new solution is composed of active compounds from Solidago virgaurea, a European plant containing saponins that are effective in controlling the growth of mixed fungal-bacterial biofilms. Bucovia regulates Candida albicans genes involved in biofilm formation and inhibits its bacterial partners. 

Nutrition & Health News

“Beetroot pill” could help reduce the risk of kidney failure after heart x-ray

22 Feb 2018 --- The humble beetroot may be the key to reducing the risk of kidney failure in patients having a heart x-ray. This is according to research led by Queen Mary University of London, which has embarked on a new research project funded by national charity Heart Research UK will look into whether dietary inorganic nitrate found commonly in beetroot could be used in pill form to prevent one of the most common causes of kidney failure in hospital.

Nutrition & Health News

Drink up: Wine polyphenols may improve oral health

22 Feb 2018 --- Wine polyphenols might be good for your oral health, researchers report in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Previous research had already pointed to the heart and colon health benefits of sipping wine, which are possibly due to the beverage's abundant and structurally diverse polyphenols.

Nutrition & Health News

Pterocarpus marsupium extract found to help lower blood glucose in diabetic rodents

22 Feb 2018 --- Pterocarpus marsupium extracts help lower blood glucose and HbA1c levels, increasing the levels of the hormone insulin in diabetic rats. This is according to a recently published study in the Journal of Dietary Supplements. Manufactured by Sami Labs (the manufacturing arm of Sabinsa Corporation), these extracts contain water-soluble C-glycosidic components and lower oxidative stress and inflammatory markers such as TNF-α, IL-6 (and its mRNA) in diabetic hepatic tissue. 

Nutrition & Health News

Chronic heavy drinking major risk factor for dementia: The Lancet

21 Feb 2018 --- Excessive alcohol use is a major risk factor for onset of all types of dementia, especially early-onset dementia, according to a French nationwide observational study, published in The Lancet Public Health journal. Previous research has shown mixed results regarding the effect of alcohol on cognitive health, with some studies showing a possible benefit of light to moderate drinking, while others have found detrimental effects of heavy drinking on dementia risk.

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/news/risk-of-heart-disease-in-food-deserts-linked-to-income-rather-than-access-to-healthy-food.html