Researchers uncover how dietary fiber fuels gut health maintaining cells

698e019f-b58f-4017-ad85-ff3b8fa152baarticleimage.jpg

11 Aug 2017 --- Researchers at UC Davis Health have discovered how by-products of the digestion of dietary fiber by gut microbes act as the right fuel to aid intestinal cells in maintaining gut health. The findings are significant because they identify a potential therapeutic target for rebalancing gut microbiota, adding to a growing body of knowledge on the complex interplay between gut microbiota and dietary fiber.

The research was published in the journal Science, and an accompanying Insights / Perspectives article in the same issue describes gut microbes as “partners” in the body's defense against potentially infectious agents, such as Salmonella.

According to Andreas Bäumler, professor of medical microbiology and immunology at UC Davis Health and senior author of the study, the research suggests that feeding the beneficial microbes in our intestines dietary fiber, their preferred source of sustenance, may be one of the best approaches to maintaining gut health.

“While it is known that the gut is the site of constant turf wars between microbes, our research suggests that signals generated by beneficial microbes drive the intestinal tract to limit resources that could lead to an expansion of potentially harmful microbes,” he says.

Resident gut microbes metabolize indigestible dietary fiber to produce short-chain fatty acids, which signal cells lining the large bowel to maximize oxygen consumption, thereby limiting the amount of oxygen diffusing into the gut lumen (the open space within the intestine that comes into direct contact with digested food.)

“Interestingly, the beneficial gut bacteria that are able to breakdown fiber don't survive in an environment rich in oxygen, which means that our microbiota and intestinal cells work together to promote a virtuous cycle that maintains gut health,” says Mariana X. Byndloss, assistant project scientist and first author on the study.

The new research identified the host receptor peroxisome proliferator receptor gamma (PPARg) as the regulator responsible for maintaining this cycle of protection.

“When this host signaling pathway malfunctions, it leads to increased oxygen levels in the gut lumen,” Bäumler says. “These higher oxygen levels make us more susceptible to aerobic enteric pathogens such as Salmonella or Escherichia coli, which use oxygen to edge out competing beneficial microbes.”

Related Articles

Nutrition & Health News

Taking iron supplements every other day may help with absorption

20 Oct 2017 --- A study has found that in iron-depleted women, providing iron supplements daily as divided doses increases serum hepcidin and reduces iron absorption. According to the results, providing iron supplements on alternate days and in single doses optimizes iron absorption and might be a preferable dosing regimen.

Nutrition & Health News

Obesity’s many risks may include worsening asthma in children

20 Oct 2017 --- Obesity has been found to be a risk factor for repeated hospital admissions among children in Japan hospitalized for asthma, researchers report in a Pediatric Allergy & Immunology study. Asthma and obesity are common chronic illnesses and public health problems for children in developed countries like Japan. The prevalence of asthma and obesity is increasing, and the study authors note that several studies reported an association between obesity and asthma in children.

Food Ingredients News

Taiyo’s Sunfiber earns Monash University’s Low FODMAP Certification

20 Oct 2017 --- Nutritional ingredient company Taiyo has announced that its premium branded ingredient Sunfiber is the first fiber and first standalone ingredient to become a Monash University Low FODMAP Certified product. Sunfiber, made from guar bean, is also one of the only soluble fiber ingredients approved by the FDA in 2016 to be listed as a dietary fiber.

Nutrition & Health News

Satiety: Mushrooms may trump meat in helping to feel fuller for longer

19 Oct 2017 --- If breakfast is the most important meal of the day, then a new Mushroom Council-funded study suggests mushrooms may be one of the most important ingredients. The study on satiety, published in the October issue of the journal Appetite, indicates that eating a mushroom-rich breakfast may result in less hunger and a greater feeling of fullness after a mushroom breakfast compared to a meat breakfast.

Nutrition & Health News

Health claims on snack bar packaging lead to better consumer sensory acceptance: study

19 Oct 2017 --- A study looking into the influence of package and health-related claims on perception and sensory acceptability of snack bars has found that when health claims were given to consumers, a better sensory acceptance was observed. Among other findings, package attributes, price and flavor were also highlighted on purchase intention of bars.

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/news/researchers-uncover-how-dietary-fiber-fuels-gut-health-maintaining-cells.html