Omega 3, antioxidants key in slowing age-related inflammation: report

7f509b7f-6948-451b-9dd3-d08dfe5d006farticleimage.jpg

09 Oct 2017 --- A group of experts believes evidence exists in the elderly for omega 3 fatty acid, probiotic, prebiotic, antioxidant and polyphenol interventions as a means to influence “inflammaging” – aging characterized by increased levels of inflammatory markers in the bloodstream – and to boost healthy aging.

The enhanced inflammation tone of “inflammaging,” also designated as low-grade inflammation, is associated with the age-related decline of many functional systems and with an increased risk of sickness, poor well-being and mortality.

Nutritional strategies deal with “inflammaging”
In the just-published article commissioned by the ILSI Europe Nutrition, Immunity and Inflammation Task Force, experts determine the potential drivers and the effects of the “inflamed” phenotype observed in the elderly, and discuss the possibility of modulating LGI in the aging population by applying nutritional strategies.

Slowing, controlling or reversing LGI is likely to be an important way to prevent or reduce the severity of age-related functional decline and the onset of unfavorable health conditions, according to ILSI Europe.

Since microbial imbalance plays a role in sub-optimal human metabolism and is linked to impaired immune and brain functions associated with aging, there is probably a key role for nutrition in influencing health and well-being through microbiota-mediated effects, ILSI Europe adds. In addition, many dietary components may affect inflammation directly.

Fight inflammation to fight decline
Inflammation, a normal component of host defense, is beneficial as an acute, transient reaction to harmful conditions, facilitating the maintenance of host physiology. However, chronic and low-grade inflammation (LGI) is detrimental for many tissues and organs.

Ageing is characterized by an increase in the concentration of inflammatory markers in the bloodstream and this is associated with increased risk of disease and poor well-being. Prevention or control of “inflammaging” therefore seems to be an attractive target effect for healthy food or food ingredients.

“With an increasing number of older people in our populations we need to identify targets in order to prevent age-related functional decline so that people can live a healthier and happier life,” comments Professor Philip Calder, University of Southampton (UK).

“This report clearly identifies the role of low-grade inflammation in the aging process,” Calder continues. “Further, it highlights several nutrition-related strategies that might prevent, control or even reverse the inflammation of aging.”

Companies in the healthy aging space are taking the opportunity to market products with anti-inflammation properties. For example, in NutritionInsight’s recent special report about healthy aging, Naturex’s organic turmeric and devil’s claw products were particularly highlighted by the company for their anti-inflammation properties.

Inflammation is toward the top of the list of problems that products targeted at “silver consumers” may have to deal with. These consumers’ needs were discussed at Vitafoods 2017 Asia in a panel discussion that covered other subjects of concern to the “silver consumer” like heart health and vitamin D.

To contact our editorial team please email us at editorial@cnsmedia.com

Related Articles

Nutrition & Health News

“Why overcomplicate nutrition?” Huel co-founder and CEO on market potential of complete meal replacements

22 Jun 2018 --- “People overcomplicate nutrition; it’s not rocket science. For the lay consumer, getting your nutrition right needn’t be that hard.” This is according to nutritionist James Collier, co-founder of Huel, a meal replacement brand currently seeing huge growth in Europe and the US. Launched three years ago, the company is reportedly one the fastest growing companies in the UK, with revenues of over £14 million (US$18.6 million) in 2017. 

Nutrition & Health News

Weekly Digest: Probiotics reduce bone loss in older women, Optibiotix expands reach in Italy

22 Jun 2018 --- This week in nutrition, Australian Whole Grain Week launched a new diet database in the hope to enhance healthy diets across the country. In research news, UK scientists warn that the normalization of plus-size body shapes may undermine obesity reduction efforts, while probiotics were found to have a significant protective effect for the bones of older women, and further research found that four cups of coffee seemed to protect the heart. Optimum Nutrition and Faber embarked on a campaign to improve American travel snacking habits and Optibiotix and Alfasigma partnered to commercialize Optibiotix's probiotic supplement in Italy. Lastly, this year’s Institute of Food Technologist (IFT18) in Chicago, US, will see NZMP launching a new milk protein ingredient and Lycored delivering some excitement on the floor with “culinary art.”

Nutrition & Health News

“Postbiotics” & smart toilet paper: Future platforms in digestive health?

22 Jun 2018 --- “Postbiotics” – the metabolic byproducts produced by our gut bacteria – and even smart toilet paper are some of the ideas within digestive health put forward following novel research at King's College London into the function of gut bacteria. Linked to a range of health-related conditions, the gut microbiome has been a topic of growing interest. However, although there is an established list of gut bacteria, their function in the gut has remained reasonably unknown. The researchers have set out to create a database of fecal metabolites – compounds produced by the gut microbiome – in an attempt to shed light on the relationship between what we eat, the way it is processed by our gut microbes and how we accumulate abdominal fat. 

Nutrition & Health News

Zero proof that probiotics can ease your anxiety, research reveals

21 Jun 2018 --- Those hoping to alleviate their anxiety with the use of probiotics should probably put down that yogurt spoon or supplement bottle and call a professional instead. This is according to researchers from the University of Kansas who reviewed available research, finding evidence that probiotics can reduce anxiety in rodents, but not in humans. The researchers reviewed data from 22 preclinical studies involving 743 animals and 14 clinical studies of 1,527 individuals, and found that probiotics did “not significantly reduce symptoms of anxiety in humans and did not differentially affect clinical and healthy human samples.”

Business News

Probiotic expansion: General Mills leads investment in GoodBelly parent

21 Jun 2018 --- General Mills' venture arm, 301 Inc., is leading a US$12 million round in funding in NextFoods the parent company of GoodBelly Probiotics. Additional capital is coming from existing investors, including Emil Capital Partners. NextFoods was founded in 2007 by Todd Beckman and Steve Demos, who founded WhiteWave Foods, the owner of Silk plant-based milk.

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/news/omega-3-antioxidants-key-in-slowing-age-related-inflammation-report.html