Obesity’s many risks may include worsening asthma in children

d14a6ec3-60b3-4a8f-bef7-51fc0eb16b3earticleimage.jpg

20 Oct 2017 --- Obesity has been found to be a risk factor for repeated hospital admissions among children in Japan hospitalized for asthma, researchers report in a Pediatric Allergy & Immunology study. Asthma and obesity are common chronic illnesses and public health problems for children in developed countries like Japan. The prevalence of asthma and obesity is increasing, and the study authors note that several studies reported an association between obesity and asthma in children.

Obese group more likely to be readmitted
The study authors obtained the hospital discharge records of inpatients aged 3 to 8 years with a diagnosis of asthma using a national inpatient database in Japan. The researchers excluded children with chronic medical conditions other than asthma and obesity (congenital heart, kidney, pulmonary, endocrine, hematologic, gastrointestinal, and neurologic diseases; cancer or leukemia; and autoimmune disease) using version 2 of the pediatric complex chronic conditions classification system.

The study included 38,679 patients, including 3,177 underweight, 28,904 normal weight, 3,334 overweight and 3,264 obese patients. Those in the obese group were more likely to be readmitted to the hospital within 30 days of discharge and to have longer hospital stays than those in the normal-weight group. No significant difference was observed between the four groups regarding the need for intensive care and total hospitalization costs.

The study authors point out that obesity is an economically complicating factor for children hospitalized with asthma in the US. Nationwide studies in the US from 2000 to 2012 revealed that obesity was associated with increased hospitalization costs and prolonged length of stay among children with asthma. The differences in cost and length of hospital stay between normal weight and obese pediatric inpatients with asthma were US$1,588 to US$2,145 and 0.24 to 0.59 days, respectively.

In contrast, the results of the Pediatric Allergy & Immunology study demonstrated the difference in total costs between obesity and normal weight asthma patients was insignificant, which may have reflected the different payment and insurance systems between the US and Japan.

Furthermore, the study showed that the difference in length of hospital stay was 0.12 days between the two groups. “These differences in length of hospital stay may reflect the difficulty and complexity of procedures such as airway management, complications and greater severity of the illness,” the researchers note.

Limited but important
The researchers admit there were several limitations in the study. The number of preexisting allergic disorders may have been underestimated and led to the bias toward the null because of possible misclassifications. Several potential confounders could not be adjusted because detailed clinical information, patient socioeconomic factors, and laboratory data were unavailable in the Diagnosis Procedure Combination database, they add.

However, it is noted that a unique feature and strength of the study was the use of a national inpatient database to examine the associations between body mass index (BMI) and the clinical outcomes of asthma among hospitalized children in Japan. Using the Japanese database, researchers were able to calculate robust national estimates of the effects of obesity on asthma exacerbations among pediatric inpatients.

“Pediatric obesity was significantly associated with an increased risk of 30-day re-admission for Japanese children hospitalized with acute asthma exacerbation,” conclude the authors of the study. “Our investigations provide important information for the prevention of obesity in children with asthma.”

In other recent news, preventing asthma attacks may also be accomplished with vitamin D, according to another recent study showing nutrition’s effects on the condition. The research led by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) found that taking oral vitamin D supplements in addition to standard asthma medication could halve the risk of asthma attacks that require a visit to the hospital.

Related Articles

Nutrition & Health News

Drink your vitamins: SternVitamin launches micronutrient premix for beverages 

19 Feb 2018 --- A healthy lifestyle is essential to all age groups, and nutrition plays a major role alongside various other components. SternVitamin is now offering beverage manufacturers a novel way to address the topic of health with a new micronutrient premix for healthy bones and heart. SternVitamin notes that the mix picks up on one of the top trends in the beverage market – water-based enriched products. The vegan premix contains vitamins B1, B12, C, K2 and D3. Organic agave syrup powder gives it a slight sweetness, while natural flavors give the drink a “dark berry” taste. It dissolves clear in water and leaves no turbidity. 

Nutrition & Health News

Yogurt may reduce cardiovascular disease risk

19 Feb 2018 --- A higher yogurt intake is associated with lower cardiovascular disease risk among hypertensive men and women, a study in the American Journal of Hypertension suggests. High blood pressure is a major cardiovascular disease risk factor. Clinical trials have previously demonstrated beneficial effects of dairy consumption on cardiovascular health, and yogurt may independently be related to cardiovascular disease risk.

Nutrition & Health News

“Unhelpful”: EU regulatory framework fuels nutrition industry dissatisfaction 

16 Feb 2018 --- A survey reveals that one-third of all nutrition industry professionals believe that the current EU framework for achieving a health claim on new products is stunting innovation because it’s complicated, expensive, long-winded and has several “gray areas.” And “regulation frustration” is a strong feeling running through the industry with many more professionals now believing the current EU regulatory environment is “unhelpful” – a 25 percent hike compared with statistics from the beginning of 2017. Experts are attributing this sharp rise in dissatisfaction to the EU’s tough stance on health claims and the current regulatory deadlock on botanicals.

Nutrition & Health News

Indulgence has reached even America’s healthiest eaters: research

16 Feb 2018 --- New research reveals even the US’ healthiest eaters reach for indulgence foods based on their emotional states. Forty percent of US food-brand lovers who rated their daily diet as extremely healthy agreed with the statement, “When I’m feeling down, I eat something indulgent to make me feel better.” The study, conducted by full-service food branding agency, Foodmix Marketing Communications, breaks out a large group of brand lovers into smaller, differentiated and more actionable consumer segments.  

Nutrition & Health News

Research driving demand for OPO in China’s formula market: Advanced Lipids

16 Feb 2018 --- OPO is increasing in popularity in China’s infant formula market, and according to Advanced Lipids, this is down to the growing body of scientific research backing the benefits of this ingredient. Also known as SN-2 palmitate, OPO is a premium quality ingredient that mimics the fatty acid profile of human milk.

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/news/obesitys-many-risks-may-include-worsening-asthma-in-children.html