Fruit and Veg Cut Blood Pressure and Medical Bills

636095309083416019choppingboard.jpg

15 Sep 2016 --- By adding more fruits and vegetables to the diet, US patients with kidney disease can significantly reduce their blood pressure, and therefore their medicine expenses, compared to those who treated with a baking soda regimen or did not receive acid-reducing treatment.

The study was presented at the American Heart Association’s High Blood Pressure 2016 Scientific Sessions.

“It was remarkable that we achieved better blood pressure control using fewer drugs and without forcing people to change their diet completely,” ,” said Nimrit Goraya, M.D., study author and program director for nephrology at Baylor Scott & White Health in Temple, Texas.

“Instead, we provided food for the entire family so they could add fruits and vegetables to what they normally eat. This was important because many of these patients lived in neighborhoods without access to fruits and vegetables through local food banks or grocery stores.”

Diseased kidneys are less able to eliminate acid from the body, which can create abnormally high acid levels in the blood, a condition called metabolic acidosis.

People with kidney disease are often treated with sodium bicarbonate, or baking soda, to neutralize this excess acid. However, because many fruits and vegetables naturally reduce acid after they are digested, increasing those fruits and vegetables in the diet can also treat metabolic acidosis.

Researchers compared blood pressure control in patients who received acidosis treatment via sodium bicarbonateor fruits and vegetables to patients who did not receive acidosis treatment. Acidosis treatment was intended to cut the acid load on the kidneys by half. All patients (36 in each group) were treated with medications to reduce their systolic (upper number) blood pressure to less than 130 mm Hg.

After 5 years, the average systolic blood pressure was lower (125 mm Hg) in the fruit and vegetable group than in patients receiving sodium bicarbonate (135 mm Hg) or no acidosis treatment (134 mm Hg). Although all groups started the study taking similar doses of common blood pressure drugs, by the end daily doses were lower in the fruit and vegetable group than in patients receiving sodium bicarbonate or no acidosis treatment.

The average 5-year drug cost for maintaining blood pressure was nearly half in the fruit and vegetable group ($79,760) than the sodium bicarbonate ($155,372) or no treatment groups ($152,305).

“In the long run, adding 3-4 servings of fruits and vegetables to the diet reduces blood pressure and lets people take fewer blood pressure drugs, reducing their medical costs,” Goraya said.

Related Articles

Nutrition & Health News

“Unhelpful”: EU regulatory framework fuels nutrition industry dissatisfaction 

16 Feb 2018 --- A survey reveals that one-third of all nutrition industry professionals believe that the current EU framework for achieving a health claim on new products is stunting innovation because it’s complicated, expensive, long-winded and has several “gray areas.” And “regulation frustration” is a strong feeling running through the industry with many more professionals now believing the current EU regulatory environment is “unhelpful” – a 25 percent hike compared with statistics from the beginning of 2017. Experts are attributing this sharp rise in dissatisfaction to the EU’s tough stance on health claims and the current regulatory deadlock on botanicals.

Nutrition & Health News

Vegan diet improves diabetes markers in overweight adults: study

16 Feb 2018 --- A plant-based diet improves beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity in overweight adults with no history of diabetes, according to a new study published in Nutrients by researchers from the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. Measuring the function of beta cells, which store and release insulin, can help assess future type 2 diabetes risk.

Nutrition & Health News

Plant-based foods could slash a country’s healthcare costs by billions of euros, says study

15 Feb 2018 --- Billions of euros could be saved from a country’s annual healthcare bill over the next years if more people followed a plant-based diet. This is according to a new study published in the Journal of Nutrition which looked at the health and economic consequences of two plant-based eating patterns, a diet with a daily portion of soy foods and a Mediterranean-style diet.

Nutrition & Health News

Façade? British Nutrition Foundation questions benefit of skin beauty nutraceuticals

14 Feb 2018 --- Although there is a growing market for orally consumed beauty supplements that promise “youthful,” “firm” and “glowing” skin, the evidence to support some of the ingredients used in these popular, and often costly, products is limited. This is according to a review of published research conducted by the British Nutrition Foundation (BNF). The review concludes that nutraceuticals for skin may not add further benefit to the effects already obtained from a healthy diet. 

Nutrition & Health News

Bad for the heart: Lobby group slams retailers for high salt meals for Valentine’s Day 

14 Feb 2018 --- Top retailers are providing excessive salt, calories, saturated fat and sugars in their Valentine’s “dine-in” meal deals at bargain prices – that is the assertion from Consensus Action on Salt and Health (CASH), a campaign group concerned with salt and its effects on health. The UK organization has carried out a new survey that reveals high levels of salt “hidden” in Valentine’s Day meal deals on sale at some of Britain’s biggest supermarkets. 

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/news/fruit-and-veg-cut-blood-pressure-and-medical-bills.html