Disordered eating among young adults has long-term negative health effects: study

5ed20553-5e4f-4c89-8776-ad54227bf91darticleimage.jpg

22 Nov 2017 --- Disordered eating among young adults has long-term effects on their health, according to a recent University of Helsinki study. The study showed that disordered eating among 24-year-old women and men was an indicator of higher body weight, larger waist circumference and lower psychological wellbeing as well as a lower self-evaluation of general health both at age 24 and ten years later.

“Disordered eating is often seen as harmless as it is so common. However, it seems that disordered eating may have far-reaching negative effects on the general health and wellbeing of young adults,” says researcher and nutritionist Ulla Kärkkäinen. “Even if the symptoms do not constitute a clinical eating disorder, early recognition and treatment are important, also for men.”

Published in the European Eating Disorders Review, the study included more than 4,900 young Finnish men and women. The research participants answered questionnaires on eating behavior, weight, health and psychological wellbeing at age 24 and again, ten years later at age 34.

When all variables were considered, disordered eating at age 24 was a predictor of lower psychological well-being among both women and men as well as a lower self-evaluation of health among men ten years later.
Eating is disordered when a person arbitrarily decides when they are hungry or full, regardless of how they are feeling; weighs themselves constantly; or drinks non-caloric drinks to keep from feeling hungry. Eating can also be considered disordered if a person meticulously plans each meal long into the future, counts calories and weighs foods, follows an excessively strict diet or cuts certain foods from their diet claiming health or ethical reasons, when the real motivation is weight loss, describes Kärkkäinen.

“These results prove that disordered eating is detrimental to the physical and mental health of young adults both in the short and long term. Previous research has established that low psychological wellbeing and a poor self-evaluation of health are predictors of higher susceptibility to physical illness and mortality. To mitigate these long-term negative effects, we must recognize disordered eating early and direct sufferers to treatment,” says Kärkkäinen.

Related Articles

Nutrition & Health News

Relief from food allergies may come from antibody drug and food desensitization

12 Dec 2017 --- A clinical trial of 48 children with multiple food allergies which tested antibody drug omalizumab alongside food desensitization treatment resulted in more effective allergy relief compared to placebo, according to a study published in The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology journal.

Nutrition & Health News

Mood food: Diet differentially affects mental health in young and mature adults

12 Dec 2017 --- Diet and dietary practices have a differential effect on mental health in young adults versus older adults, according to research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. The researchers involved have found that young adults appear to be dependent on food that increases availability of neurotransmitter precursors and concentrations in the brain (meat), while the mood in mature adults (over 30 years) may be more reliant on food that increases availability of antioxidants (fruits) and abstinence of food that inappropriately activates the sympathetic nervous system (coffee, high glycemic index and skipping breakfast).

Nutrition & Health News

EVNol Tocotrienol may beat omeprazole in controlling gastric issues

12 Dec 2017 --- ExcelVite’s EVNol tocotrienol was found to be more effective in treating gastric growth factors in stress-exposed rats than omeprazole, a common medication used in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease and peptic ulcer disease. This is according to a recently published study in the World Journal of Gastroenterology that suggests more investigation is warranted.
 

Business News

Nutrition 21 launches US media campaign to support Velositol ingredient

11 Dec 2017 --- Nutrition 21, LLC has partnered with NYC-based media relations firm Pitch Publicity and clinical pharmacist James B. LaValle in a national media tour dedicated to educating consumers about the benefits of its proprietary ingredient, Velositol.

Nutrition & Health News

Soy, cruciferous vegetables linked to fewer breast cancer treatment side effects

11 Dec 2017 --- Consuming soy foods and cruciferous vegetables – such as cabbages, kale, collard greens, bok choy, Brussels sprouts and broccoli – may be associated with a reduction in common side effects of breast cancer treatment in breast cancer survivors, according to a team of scientists led by Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. Understanding the role of life style factors with regard to the side effects is important because diet can serve as a modifiable target for possibly reducing symptoms among breast cancer survivors.

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/news/disordered-eating-among-young-adults-has-long-term-negative-health-effects-study.html