Chronic liver inflammation linked to Western diet, gut microbiota

3c77f3e2-8e13-49ee-b6c9-e201980727bbarticleimage.jpg

12 Jul 2017 --- A new study reports that feeding mice a Western diet, which is high in fat and sugar, resulted in hepatic inflammation, especially in males. Moreover, liver inflammation was most pronounced in Western diet-fed male mice that also lacked farnesoid x receptor (FXR), a bile acid receptor. The study is important because it links diet to changes in the gut microbiota as well as bile acid profile, pointing to the possibility that probiotics and bile acid receptor agonists may be useful for the prevention and treatment of hepatic inflammation and progression into advanced liver diseases.

“We know the transition from steatosis, or fatty liver, to steatohepatitis (inflammation in the fatty liver) plays a crucial role in liver injury and carcinogenesis. Because the liver receives 70 percent of its blood supply from the intestine, it is important to understand how the gut contributes to liver disease development,” explains lead investigator Yu-Jui Yvonne Wan, Professor and Vice Chair of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at UC Davis Health.
 
The research team used an FXR-deficient mouse model (FXR KO), which has become an important tool to better understand the role of diet and inflammation in the development of liver diseases including cancer because patients with cirrhosis or liver cancer also have low FXR levels.

Other published data have already shown that FXR-deficient mice spontaneously develop steatohepatitis and liver tumors even when they are fed a normal rodent diet. 

In this study, wild-type and FXR-deficient mice were fed either a Western diet or a matching control diet for ten months. They found similarities between Western diet intake and FXR deficiency. For instance, both Western diet-fed wild-type mice and control diet-fed FXR KO mice developed steatosis, which also was more severe in males than females. Interestingly, however, only the FXR-deficient male mice had massive lymphocyte and neutrophil infiltration in the liver, and only Western diet-fed male FXR KO mice had fatty adenomas.

Depending on what type of diet was provided, broad-spectrum antibiotics, which eliminated most gut bacteria, affected hepatic inflammation differently in FXR-deficient mice. In control diet-fed mice, a cocktail of ampicillin, neomycin, metronidazole and vancomycin completely blocked hepatic neutrophil and lymphocyte infiltration. 

However, this cocktail of antibiotics (Abx) was not able to eliminate hepatic inflammation in Western diet-fed FXR KO mice. Additional analysis showed that many inflammatory genes had higher expression levels in the Western diet than control diet-fed FXR KO mice after Abx treatment.

Analyzing the composition of the gut microbiota, investigators found that Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes persisted after the broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment in the Western diet-fed FXR KO mice. In contrast, Gram-negative coverage antibiotic, i.e., polymyxin B, increased Firmicutes and decreased Proteobacteria as well as hepatic inflammation in Western diet-fed FXR KO male mice. They suggest that the adverse effects of Western diet on the liver may be explained in part by the persistence of pro-inflammatory Proteobacteria as well as the reduction of anti-inflammatory Firmicutes in the gut.

Primary and secondary bile acids are synthesized by liver cells and gut bacteria, respectively. Bile acids are signaling molecules for lipid and sugar homeostasis as well as inflammatory response. The data generated from this group revealed that the reduced hepatic inflammation by antibiotics was accompanied by decreased free and conjugated secondary bile acids in a gender-dependent manner.  

“Gut and liver health are linked. It is clear that microbial imbalance and dysregulated bile acid synthesis are inseparable, and they jointly contribute to hepatic inflammation via the gut-liver axis. In addition, gut microbiota and bile acid profiles may explain gender difference in liver disease as liver cancer incidence is much higher in men than women. Moreover, in antibiotic-treated mice, the change in the profile of bile acids can also be primary as well as secondary to the alterations in gut microbiota because antibiotics can directly eliminate bile acid-generating bacteria, which in turn causes additional changes in the bile acid composition,” notes Dr. Wan. “Our results suggest that probiotics and FXR agonists hold promise for the prevention and treatment of hepatic inflammation and progression into advanced liver diseases such as cancer.”

The study was published in The American Journal of Pathology.

Related Articles

Business News

BASF: “considerable” Q2 earnings growth, but Nutrition & Health sales stall

27 Jul 2017 --- BASF Group has announced that its second quarter sales rose by 12 percent to €16.3 billion (US$19.11 billion) compared with the same period in 2016. The group states that this was largely attributable to higher prices and volumes. Amid higher raw material costs, the company raised sales prices by 7 percent; this was mainly driven by higher prices in the Chemicals segment. Sales volumes increased by 3 percent. Currency effects had a positive impact on sales and, like portfolio effects, accounted for a 1 percent increase.

Regulatory News

Cargill’s erythritol dental health claim rejected by EFSA

27 Jul 2017 --- Cargill cannot prove its EU Article 14 claim submission [disease risk reduction claim] that there is a cause-and-effect relationship between sugar-free hard confectionery with at least 90 percent erythritol and the reduction of dental plaque, according to the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA).

Business News

Algatech eyes Brazil market following Anvisa approval for astaxanthin line

27 Jul 2017 --- Algatechnologies has received Brazilian Health Regulatory Agency (Anvisa) approval for its all-natural astaxanthin AstaPure to be used as a food ingredient. This approval makes Algatech the first astaxanthin supplier to start marketing its clean-label astaxanthin under the AstaPure brand in Brazil. 

Nutrition & Health News

Binge drinking among young US adults not in college increased

27 July 2017 --- Binge drinking rates are finally down among US college students aged 18 to 24, after years of increases, but they are up among those in the same age group who are not in college, according to a study in the July issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. The same study also found that alcohol-related hospitalizations and overdose deaths have increased generally among 18- to 24-year-olds.

Business News

Food and health startups get chance to impress in Innovation Challenge

27 Jul 2017 --- Innovative ingredient projects, carried out by startups that have brought something completely new and unexpected to the food and health markets, will be rewarded as part of the Startup Innovation Challenge during the next Fi Europe & Ni show from November 28 to 30 this year.

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/news/chronic-liver-inflammation-linked-to-western-diet-gut-microbiota.html