Capsaicin From Chili Peppers Could Help Kill Cancer Cells

635775216345788099chilismixed.jpg

11 Sep 2015 --- Capsaicin, the compound responsible for chilies’ heat, is used in creams sold to relieve pain, and recent research shows that in high doses, it kills prostate cancer cells. Now researchers are finding clues that help explain how the substance works. Their conclusions suggest that one day it could come in a new, therapeutic form. Their study appears in ACS’ The Journal of Physical Chemistry B.

About 10 years ago, researchers reported that capsaicin can kill prostate cancer cells in mice while leaving healthy cells unharmed. But translating that dose to humans would require them to eat a huge number of chili peppers per day. Figuring out how capsaicin works could help researchers transform it into an effective drug in the form of an injection or pill. Until recently, scientists did not understand the mechanism by which capsaicin targeted cancer cells, but they have now figured out that the molecule binds to a cell’s surface and affects the membrane, which surrounds and protects the cell. That finding prompted Ashok Kumar Mishra and Jitendriya Swain to try to gain a deeper understanding of capsaicin’s effects so it might be harnessed in the future for new medicines.

The scientists were able to detect how the compound interacts with cell membranes by monitoring its natural fluorescence. The study showed that capsaicin lodges in the membranes near the surface. Add enough of it, and the capsaicin essentially causes the membranes to come apart. This means that the cancer cell is exposed and vulnerable to conventional and other treatments With additional research, this insight could help lead to novel tools against cancer or other conditions. It has previously been discovered that capsaicin induces cancer cell apoptosis via inhibition of mitochondrial respiration which the cells rely on to survive.

To contact our editorial team please email us at editorial@cnsmedia.com

Related Articles

Health & Nutrition News

Microbe colonization study could inspire better probiotics, claim researchers

13 Aug 2018 --- A novel approach to identify the genes that may be important to help microbes live successfully in the human gut has been identified by a study published in PLOS Computational Biology. The approach utilizes a technique called phylogenetic linear modeling, which has often been used in ecology, but rarely in genomics. The researchers hope that the findings could be important for the development of new therapies to maintain or improve gut health, such as the design of better probiotics.

Health & Nutrition News

UK women of childbearing age falling short on key micronutrient requirements, survey finds

13 Aug 2018 --- The micronutrient intake of women in their childbearing years, as well as young people in general, fall short in key micronutrients such as magnesium and selenium. UK researchers note that improvements in dietary quality are needed in young adulthood and mid-life. Alongside this, fortification and supplementation strategies may be considered to help adults achieve dietary targets at this life-stage when they should be at their “nutritional prime.”

Health & Nutrition News

Weekly Roundup: Curcumin extract may prevent non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, eggs recommended in early weaning

03 Aug 2018 --- The weekly roundup is NutritionInsight's collection of global nutrition stories from the past week. In research news, bioactive curcumin extract BCM-95 was noted for its role in preventing and treating Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD), folic acid supplementation may be key to lowering the risk of language skill delays in children whose mothers take drugs for epilepsy and women appear to have a more considerable aversion to eating meat than men after seeing pictures of baby animals. Lastly, British Lion Eggs, a UK food safety scheme, notes that a UK government report has highlighted the benefits of feeding the allergenic foods of eggs and peanuts to babies from the age of six months old.

Health & Nutrition News

Biofortification: The answer to boosting academic performance in India?

02 Aug 2018 --- The consumption of iron-biofortified pearl millet can significantly improve cognitive abilities in Indian adolescents, a study published in the Journal of Nutrition has found. Biofortification uses conventional crop breeding to increase micronutrient levels, to help address preventable deficiencies of key vitamins and minerals. The researchers note that the study findings indicate the potential long-term effects of boosting Indian adolescents’ cognition, potentially increasing social mobility through improved academic and professional performance.

Health & Nutrition News

Plant-based portfolio diet found to lower risk factors for heart disease

30 Jul 2018 --- The portfolio diet, a plant-based way of eating previously shown to lower cholesterol levels, also reduces other risk factors for cardiovascular disease including blood pressure, triglycerides and inflammation, University of Toronto researchers have found. In addition to reducing LDL (or “bad”) cholesterol by about 30 percent when combined with a low-saturated fat diet – a level comparable to medications – the researchers found the diet limited other factors for an estimated 13 percent reduction in the overall risk for coronary heart disease, which includes angina and heart attack.

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/news/capsaicin-from-chili-peppers-could-help-kill-cancer-cells.html