Bad for the bones: Average calcium intake varies widely around world, study notes

eb9af890-cb40-42fa-b60b-107cef9fa2d5articleimage.jpg

30 Oct 2017 --- A new study led by an International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) research committee has found that daily average calcium intake among adults varies widely around the world. Critically low intake was found in certain Asian, African and Latin American countries, while studies showed nearly double the intake in many European countries and the US.

Calcium is a major building block of bone, accounting for about 30 to 35 percent of its mass and much of its strength. The impact of calcium intake is most significant during adolescence, when the skeleton gains bone mass, and during later life when bone loss occurs at a rate of about 1 percent per year, resulting in calcium loss of approximately 15g per year. A major concern is that in countries with sub-optimal dietary calcium intake the population may be putting itself at increased risk of osteoporosis and related fractures.

Striking regional trends
The researchers looked at the scientific literature and other data sources for eligible studies that reported national averages of daily calcium intake among adults around the world. The studies varied widely, including by how nationally representative they were, and by their sample size. Nevertheless, there were enough eligible data for 74 countries, which revealed several notable regional trends:

  • Across the 74 countries with data, average national dietary calcium intake ranges from 175 to 1,233mg per day.
  • Southern and Eastern Asia had world's lowest average calcium intakes – often less than 400mg a day.
  • Countries in South America and Africa mostly had average intakes in the mid-range, between about 400 and 700 mg a day.
  • Only Northern European countries registered calcium intakes greater than 1,000mg a day.
  • Significant variation was seen within regions as well: for example, in Latin America, Colombia showed one of the world's lowest intakes with 297mg per day while in Mexico the daily average was found to be 805mg per day.
  • Average calcium intake is generally lower in women than in men, but there are no clear patterns across countries regarding relative calcium intake by age, sex, or socioeconomic status.

“In many parts of the world there is lower intake than there should be for good bone health,” states the study's lead author Ethan Balk, Associate Professor at the Center for Evidence Synthesis in Health, Brown University School of Public Health. “While consumption is highest among adults in North America and Europe, it is alarmingly low in Asia and in some of the world's most populous countries, including in China, India and Indonesia.”

IOF expects that the data will motivate action to promote increased calcium consumption, particularly in the Asia-Pacific region and in places where calcium consumption hasn't been documented. An interactive online global map representing the study findings will be launched by IOF on the occasion of the World Congress on Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases in April 2018.

“This study draws attention to regions where calcium intake needs to be assessed and where measures to increase calcium intake would likely provide skeletal benefits for the population,” states Bess Dawson-Hughes, M.D, Chair of the IOF Calcium Steering Committee and Director of the Bone Metabolism Laboratory at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University in Boston. “This is a necessary first step in developing culturally appropriate strategies and policies to address the deficiency.”

The study “Global dietary calcium intake among adults: a systematic review” has been published in the journal Osteoporosis International.

The news of the study’s results comes soon after it was noted at the World Dairy Summit that around a fifth of teenage girls around the world are currently falling short of their recommended daily intake of calcium. It was pointed out by Dairy UK that the decision of teenagers who turn away from dairy could be having a deleterious effect on their long-term health.

To contact our editorial team please email us at editorial@cnsmedia.com

Related Articles

Nutrition & Health News

“Why overcomplicate nutrition?” Huel co-founder and CEO on market potential of complete meal replacements

22 Jun 2018 --- “People overcomplicate nutrition; it’s not rocket science. For the lay consumer, getting your nutrition right needn’t be that hard.” This is according to nutritionist James Collier, co-founder of Huel, a meal replacement brand currently seeing huge growth in Europe and the US. Launched three years ago, the company is reportedly one the fastest growing companies in the UK, with revenues of over £14 million (US$18.6 million) in 2017. 

Food Ingredients News

DMK’s “sweeping transformation” in full swing as turnover rises to €5.8bn

22 Jun 2018 --- German dairy cooperative and company, the DMK Group has gone through some significant changes that have given rise to a €5.8 billion turnover, paying above-average milk prices to dairy farmers and becoming Europe’s largest supplier of milk produced without genetic modification.

Packaging & Technology News

Danone's baby food brands undergo image and ingredient revamp

22 Jun 2018 --- Danone Early Life Nutrition has revamped both of its baby food brands, Cow & Gate and Aptamil. Cow & Gate is launching fifteen new food recipes across the pouch, cereal, jar and tray product ranges, as well as a complete packaging re-brand across its entire formula milk and food portfolio. Starting from mid-June, the changes will be the “biggest the brand has ever undergone.” Aptamil is also launching a new patented next-generation powder formulation and a complete packaging refresh across its entire range.

Nutrition & Health News

Weekly Digest: Probiotics reduce bone loss in older women, Optibiotix expands reach in Italy

22 Jun 2018 --- This week in nutrition, Australian Whole Grain Week launched a new diet database in the hope to enhance healthy diets across the country. In research news, UK scientists warn that the normalization of plus-size body shapes may undermine obesity reduction efforts, while probiotics were found to have a significant protective effect for the bones of older women, and further research found that four cups of coffee seemed to protect the heart. Optimum Nutrition and Faber embarked on a campaign to improve American travel snacking habits and Optibiotix and Alfasigma partnered to commercialize Optibiotix's probiotic supplement in Italy. Lastly, this year’s Institute of Food Technologist (IFT18) in Chicago, US, will see NZMP launching a new milk protein ingredient and Lycored delivering some excitement on the floor with “culinary art.”

Business News

Probiotic expansion: General Mills leads investment in GoodBelly parent

21 Jun 2018 --- General Mills' venture arm, 301 Inc., is leading a US$12 million round in funding in NextFoods the parent company of GoodBelly Probiotics. Additional capital is coming from existing investors, including Emil Capital Partners. NextFoods was founded in 2007 by Todd Beckman and Steve Demos, who founded WhiteWave Foods, the owner of Silk plant-based milk.

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/news/bad-for-the-bones-average-calcium-intake-varies-widely-around-world-study-notes.html