Virgin Olive Oil as Part of Mediterranean Diet May Boost ‘Good’ Cholesterol

8bd20720-99df-4a74-b999-8ceadaf6694carticleimage.jpg

15 Feb 2017 --- According to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation, when compared with other diets, a Mediterranean diet rich in virgin olive oil may enhance the cardio protective benefits of HDL, the high-density lipoproteins known as the “good” cholesterol.

High levels of low-density lipoproteins (LDL—the “bad cholesterol”) and triglycerides, a type of blood fat, are associated with an increased risk of heart and blood vessel diseases.

HDL cholesterol is associated with a lower risk because these lipoproteins help eliminate the excess cholesterol from the bloodstream.

“However, studies have shown that HDL doesn’t work as well in people at high risk for heart attacks, strokes and other cardiovascular diseases, and that the functional ability of HDL matters as much as its quantity,” said senior study author Montserrat Fitó, M.D., Ph.D., and coordinator of the Cardiovascular Risk and Nutrition Research Group at the Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute in Barcelona and at the Ciber of Physipathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBEROBN), Spain.

“At the same time, small-scale trials have shown that consuming antioxidant-rich foods like virgin olive oil, tomatoes and berries improved HDL function in humans.”

“We wanted to test those findings in a larger, controlled study,” Fitó explained.

Fitó  spoke with NutritionInsight: “Mediterranean Diet is a healthy, tasty, and varied diet. It is cheap, planet-friendly, and easy to follow. Thus, we believe that everyone should, at least, give it a try. In our case, our conclusions are particularly addressed to people with high cardiovascular risk (e.g., with diabetes, high cholesterol levels, hypertension, obesity, etc.), but its benefits may be extended to other population as well.”

“In addition, the PREDIMED Study established that the patients who benefited from this diet presented this effect when they incorporated in their daily life 2 “Mediterranean modifications” (e.g., starting to cook with virgin olive oil; increasing their consumption of fruits to 3 portions or their intake of vegetables to 2 portions in a day; eating 3 or more servings of tree nuts, legumes, or fish per week; changing beef, lamb, pork, and processed meat for poultry, etc.). Therefore, making one of these easy changes could be the first step towards a better heart health,” Fitó explains.
 
How should the nutrition industry change their guidelines based on this research? “We provide a new possible reason to explain why following a Mediterranean Diet is protective for our cardiovascular health,” Fitó continues. “To study the cardioprotective mechanisms of an antioxidant-rich diet may contribute to the development of future therapeutic targets oriented to improve HDL functions. It would be desirable to know whether these HDL function-related properties are exerted by available hypolipaemic agents.”

Researchers randomly selected 296 people at high risk of cardiovascular disease participating in the PREDIMED (PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea) study.

Blood samples were taken from the participants at the beginning of the study and again at the end.

Participants, average age 66, were randomly assigned to one of three diets for a year: a traditional Mediterranean diet enriched with virgin olive oil (about 4 tablespoons) each day, a traditional Mediterranean diet enriched with extra nuts (about a fistful) each day, or a healthy “control” diet that reduced consumption of red meat, processed food, high-fat dairy products and sweets.

In addition to emphasizing fruit, vegetables, legumes, such as beans, chickpeas and lentils, and whole grains, both Mediterranean diets included moderate amounts of fish and poultry.

The study found that only the control diet reduced total and LDL cholesterol levels.

None of the diets increased HDL levels significantly. However the Mediterranean diets did improve HDL function. The improvement in HDL function was much larger among those consuming an extra quantity of virgin olive oil.

Fitó and her team found that the Mediterranean diet enriched with virgin olive oil improved key HDL functions, including: Reverse cholesterol transport, the process by which HDL removes cholesterol from plaque in the arteries and transports it to the liver where it is used to produce hormonal compounds or eliminated from the body.

Antioxidant protection, the ability of HDL to counteract the oxidation of LDL, which has been found to trigger the development of plaque in the arteries. Vasodilator capacity, which relaxes blood vessels, keeping them open and blood flowing.

Researchers said they were surprised to find that the control diet, which like the Mediterranean diets was rich in fruits and vegetables, had a negative impact on HDL’s anti-inflammatory properties.

A decrease in HDL’s anti-inflammatory capability is associated with cardiovascular disease.

Participants on the Mediterranean diets did not experience a decline in this important HDL function, the authors wrote.

Researchers said the differences in results between the diets were relatively small because the modifications of the Mediterranean diets were modest and the control diet was a healthy one.

Fitó added that study results are mainly focused on a high cardiovascular risk population that includes people who can obtain the most benefits from this diet intervention.

Still, Fitó said, “Following a Mediterranean diet rich in virgin olive oil could protect our cardiovascular health in several ways, including making our ‘good cholesterol’ work in a more complete way.”

by Hannah Gardiner

To contact our editorial team please email us at editorial@cnsmedia.com

Related Articles

Nutrition & Health News

Bone and joint health: Consumer demands and promising ingredients

19 Apr 2018 --- Mobility, which incorporates bone and joint health, is becoming a key concern for a range of demographics. NutritionInsight spoke with a number of key suppliers in the bone and joint health space about the key ingredients to look out for, as well as some key consumer demands driving innovation in this space.

Nutrition & Health News

Plant-based possibilities: Report details novel sugar replacements for beverages

19 Apr 2018 --- PreScouter, a Chicago based technology scouting company, details novel replacements for sugars in a new analysis, that are from natural sources, safe, technologically viable and environmentally stable, for use in beverages. The company hopes that the report answers consumer calls for sweeteners that are both natural and healthy, in light of diabetes and obesity epidemics, and that it may aid informing beverage providers on how to best respond to calls for lowering sugar levels in drinks.

Nutrition & Health News

Dosage questions: Green tea supplements may pose health risks, EFSA warns

19 Apr 2018 --- When taken as food supplements, green tea catechin doses at or above 800mg/day may pose health concerns, according to the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), which assessed the safety of green tea catechins from dietary sources, following concerns regarding their possible harmful effects on the liver. Catechins from green tea infusions and similar drinks are generally safe, the authority found, but certain supplements may be best avoided.

Nutrition & Health News

Collagen beverage innovations: PB Gelatins/PB Leiner to showcase convenient formats

19 Apr 2018 --- PB Gelatins/PB Leiner is marketing innovative solugel collagen products, that they say, make it even easier for their customers to grasp the opportunity collagen can bring to their health. The collagen industry is active and its growth is exemplified by Innova Market Insights figures, which show that there was a +34 percent compound annual growth rate (CAGR) in new product launches for collagen peptides from 2010 to 2016.

Nutrition & Health News

New study sheds light on non-celiac gluten avoidance

18 Apr 2018 --- People who avoid gluten in their diets, often avoid other food types – such as dairy and eggs – and are more likely to experience frequent adverse physiological symptoms after food consumption. The research sought to uncover why the popularity of gluten-free diets has risen so much amongst those who do not have medical gluten sensitivities.

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/news/Virgin-Olive-Oil-as-Part-of-Mediterranean-Diet-May-Boost-Good-Cholesterol.html?tracking=Nutrition%20and%20Health%20News