Routine Behaviors Key To Healthy Weight, Global Registry Finds

18 Feb 2016 ---  Simple routine behaviors such as eating meals together have been associated with maintaining healthy weight, according to Cornell Food and Brand Lab researchers.

Simple routine behaviors such as eating meals together have been associated with maintaining healthy weight, according to Cornell Food and Brand Lab researchers.
 
To shed light on the health behaviors of those who maintain a healthy weight, Cornell Food and Brand Lab researchers developed an online Global Healthy Weight Registry (formerly named the Slim by Design Registry).
 
Adults of healthy weight were invited to sign up for the registry and then answer questions about diet, exercise, and daily routines. Increased cooperation, which was also associated with better work-group performance, was also found.
 
The researcher's analysis of 147 adult Registry participants unveiled some common routine behaviors of those who stay healthy and slim. Namely, 96 percent reported eating breakfast, 42 percent exercised 5+ times a week, and 50 percent weighed themselves at least weekly.
 
Although 74 percent never or rarely dieted, 92 percent reported being conscious of what they ate. As part of their habits that lead to weight control, 44 percent reported at least one non-restrictive strategy (such as listening to inner cues, cooking at home, and eating high-quality, non-processed foods).
 
The study's co-author, Brian Wansink, PhD, director of the Food and Brand Lab and author of the book Slim by Design explains what stood out most in these findings: "Most slim people don't employ restrictive diets or intense health regimes to stay at a healthy weight. Instead, they practice easy habits like not skipping breakfast, and listening to inner cues. If you struggle with weight, try adding these simple practices to your routine, you may be surprised how easy it is to be healthy." 

Source: Food and Brand Lab – Cornell University 

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