Rice bran could help lower blood pressure- study

03 Mar 2006 --- Scientists in Japan have shown that this waste product of rice processing, called rice bran, significantly lowers blood pressure in rats whose hypertension resembles that of humans.

03/03/06 Thousands of years ago, humans began scrubbing off and discarding the outer layer of long-grain rice, preferring the polished white kernel beneath. Now, for the first time, scientists in Japan have shown that this waste product of rice processing, called rice bran, significantly lowers blood pressure in rats whose hypertension resembles that of humans.

The team reports their findings in the March 8 issue of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, published by the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society.

A commonly prescribed class of drugs called ACE inhibitors dilates the arteries of hypertensive patients and thus decreases their risk of stroke, heart attack and kidney disease. But the drugs can also carry side effects: chronic cough, allergic reactions, dizziness, even kidney problems.

What if some component of our diet could work in similar fashion, with few or no side effects? Researchers at Tohoku University and Japan’s National Research Institute of Brewing demonstrated that adding rice bran to the diets of hypertensive, stroke-prone rats lowered the animals’ systolic blood pressure by about 20 percent and, via the same mechanism, inhibited angiotensin-1 converting enzyme, or ACE.

“There’s much work being done on various bran fractions to nail down any health benefits,” says the journal’s editor, James Seiber, Ph.D., who is also director of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Western Regional Research Center in Davis, Calif. “This particular paper caught my attention for two reasons: the potential of bringing a waste product like rice bran into beneficial use, and the way the group went about their study with good controlled experiments using an appropriate model.”

It’s still not clear whether simply eating more brown rice, which retains some of its bran, would reduce the risk of heart disease. However, previous research in humans, as well as animals with high cholesterol, does suggest that certain fractions of rice bran can lower levels of unhealthy LDL cholesterol.

The Tohoku study adds antihypertensive activity to the picture, along with a host of other biochemical markers that track blood glucose (implicated in diabetes), lipid profile, kidney function and the harmful effects of free radicals.

For example, high levels of a marker called 8-OHdG indicate biological stress and genetic damage due to oxygen-based free radicals. The researchers found that rice bran, which contains various forms of the antioxidant Vitamin E, markedly lowered the rats’ levels of the peptide 8-OHdG.

“Oxidative stress plays an important role in the initiation and progression of cardiovascular diseases,” explained lead author Ardiansyah [editor note: name is correct as written, there is no first name], a Ph.D. candidate at the university’s School of Agricultural Science.

He added one more element to the research that is new: using enzymes to clip components of rice bran from its cell walls, rather than extracting a fraction with ethanol. “I think enzymatic treatment will be more suitable for applications if we’d like to use [rice bran as] functional food,” he said.

The researchers’ next step is to elucidate the mechanisms by which specific components of rice bran inhibit ACE and lower cholesterol.

The American Chemical Society - the world's largest scientific society - is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2006-03/acs-hnb030206.php

Related Articles

Nutrition & Health News

“Golden” potato delivers bounty of vitamins A and E to help combat micronutrient deficiencies

09 Nov 2017 --- An experimental “golden” potato could hold the power to prevent disease and death in developing countries where residents rely heavily upon the starchy food for sustenance, new research published in the journal PLOS ONE suggests. The involved researchers say this new potato may help combat “hidden hunger” – deficiencies in micronutrients – which has been a problem for decades in many developing countries because staple food crops were bred for high yield and pest resistance rather than nutritional quality.

Nutrition & Health News

Wholesome: Large-scale study underpins the health benefits of whole grains

03 Nov 2017 --- Exchanging refined grain products – such as white bread and pasta – with whole grain varieties causes overweight adults to eat less, lose weight, leading to a decrease in the amount of inflammation in their bodies. These are some of the findings of Danish study headed by the National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark. The study supports the scientific basis for the dietary recommendations of many countries to choose whole grains.

Regulatory News

Some infant rice cereals contain elevated methylmercury levels, study finds

26 Oct 2017 --- Eating large amounts of certain fish can expose consumers to methylmercury, which can potentially cause health problems. But recent research has shown that rice grown in polluted conditions can also have raised levels. A study appearing in the Americal Chemical Society’s (ACS) Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry reports that some types of infant rice cereal could also contain amounts of methylmercury that could potentially pose a health risk.

Nutrition & Health News

Plant power: Legume protein aids in fight against hunger and global warming

16 Oct 2017 --- An increase in growing and consuming legumes in Europe would contribute to improving worrying problems in the world such as hunger and global warming, according to scientists of the European Research Project “TRansition paths to sUstainable legume-based systems in Europe” (TRUE). The study results draw attention to the link in the food system between better nutrition and a lower agricultural impact on the environment.

Nutrition & Health News

Latest boost for plant-based protein as Quorn products show muscle benefits

12 Oct 2017 --- Protein found in Quorn meat-free foods may be just as beneficial for muscles as animal proteins, new research funded by Quorn Foods suggests. News of the successful study is the latest to highlight a rosy future for plant-based proteins in the food and beverage marketplace.

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/news/Rice-bran-could-help-lower-blood-pressure-study.html