Rice bran could help lower blood pressure- study

03 Mar 2006 --- Scientists in Japan have shown that this waste product of rice processing, called rice bran, significantly lowers blood pressure in rats whose hypertension resembles that of humans.

Thousands of years ago, humans began scrubbing off and discarding the outer layer of long-grain rice, preferring the polished white kernel beneath. Now, for the first time, scientists in Japan have shown that this waste product of rice processing, called rice bran, significantly lowers blood pressure in rats whose hypertension resembles that of humans.

The team reports their findings in the March 8 issue of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, published by the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society.

A commonly prescribed class of drugs called ACE inhibitors dilates the arteries of hypertensive patients and thus decreases their risk of stroke, heart attack and kidney disease. But the drugs can also carry side effects: chronic cough, allergic reactions, dizziness, even kidney problems.

What if some component of our diet could work in similar fashion, with few or no side effects? Researchers at Tohoku University and Japan’s National Research Institute of Brewing demonstrated that adding rice bran to the diets of hypertensive, stroke-prone rats lowered the animals’ systolic blood pressure by about 20 percent and, via the same mechanism, inhibited angiotensin-1 converting enzyme, or ACE.

“There’s much work being done on various bran fractions to nail down any health benefits,” says the journal’s editor, James Seiber, Ph.D., who is also director of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Western Regional Research Center in Davis, Calif. “This particular paper caught my attention for two reasons: the potential of bringing a waste product like rice bran into beneficial use, and the way the group went about their study with good controlled experiments using an appropriate model.”

It’s still not clear whether simply eating more brown rice, which retains some of its bran, would reduce the risk of heart disease. However, previous research in humans, as well as animals with high cholesterol, does suggest that certain fractions of rice bran can lower levels of unhealthy LDL cholesterol.

The Tohoku study adds antihypertensive activity to the picture, along with a host of other biochemical markers that track blood glucose (implicated in diabetes), lipid profile, kidney function and the harmful effects of free radicals.

For example, high levels of a marker called 8-OHdG indicate biological stress and genetic damage due to oxygen-based free radicals. The researchers found that rice bran, which contains various forms of the antioxidant Vitamin E, markedly lowered the rats’ levels of the peptide 8-OHdG.

“Oxidative stress plays an important role in the initiation and progression of cardiovascular diseases,” explained lead author Ardiansyah [editor note: name is correct as written, there is no first name], a Ph.D. candidate at the university’s School of Agricultural Science.

He added one more element to the research that is new: using enzymes to clip components of rice bran from its cell walls, rather than extracting a fraction with ethanol. “I think enzymatic treatment will be more suitable for applications if we’d like to use [rice bran as] functional food,” he said.

The researchers’ next step is to elucidate the mechanisms by which specific components of rice bran inhibit ACE and lower cholesterol.

The American Chemical Society - the world's largest scientific society - is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2006-03/acs-hnb030206.php

To contact our editorial team please email us at editorial@cnsmedia.com

Related Articles

Nutrition & Health News

Micronutrient boost: Research uncovers path to healthy, climate-friendly diets in India

26 Mar 2018 --- A study by a team of IIASA researchers has explored ways to reduce micronutrient deficiencies in India affordably while also reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The researchers used the National Sample Survey of Consumption Expenditure in India to examine Indian diets, which showed that more than two-thirds of the Indian population, around 500 million people, are affected by deficiencies in micronutrients such as protein, iron, zinc and vitamin A, which contributes to lower life expectancies. 

Nutrition & Health News

Sunshine vitamin: Kellogg’s ups vitamin D in cereals to 50 percent of daily need

22 Mar 2018 --- Kellogg’s has doubled the amount of vitamin D in many of its cereals to help tackle the chronic low levels of this essential vitamin in UK diets. The company’s cereals are to contain 50 percent of people’s daily vitamin D needs per bowl, the highest fortification level across the cereal category. Kellogg’s will roll out the cereals with 50 percent NRV vitamin D fortification across other European and Middle East markets simultaneously on the same brands as sold in the UK and Ireland, a spokesperson for the company tells NutritionInsight.  

Nutrition & Health News

Beverage innovation: Targeted nutrition, collagen and functional botanicals star at Expo West

15 Mar 2018 --- Hyper-customization, collagen and functional botanicals were among the most innovative and prevalent trends at this year’s Expo West, according to an insights report released by Imbibe, a US beverage development company. 

Nutrition & Health News

NP Nutra launches organic plant-based protein blend

05 Mar 2018 --- Nature’s Power Nutraceuticals Corp (NP Nutra) has launched an organic plant-based protein blend, named NutraProtein Power Blend.  Due to its high bioavailability and digestibility, the company reports that the protein powder supplies the body with “an energy and stamina boost to get through the rigors and stress of a busy day or a physical workout.” 

Nutrition & Health News

Resistant starch: A promising ingredient in battling malnutrition in infants

27 Feb 2018 --- An ingredient as simple as resistant starch could hold the answer to reducing malnutrition among infants in low-middle income countries, according to a study led by researchers at Flinders University in South Australia. Resistant starch occurs naturally in foods such as oats, maize and green bananas but can also easily be added to food products. The addition of this prebiotic is thought to aid gastrointestinal health, which is of particular importance in areas where sanitation is lacking.

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/news/Rice-bran-could-help-lower-blood-pressure-study.html