Omega-6 fatty acids promote prostate tumor cell growth

02 Aug 2005 --- A study has demonstrated that omega-6 fatty acids such as the fat found in corn oil promote the growth of prostate tumor cells in the laboratory.

A study conducted at the San Francisco VA Medical Center (SFVAMC) has demonstrated that omega-6 fatty acids such as the fat found in corn oil promote the growth of prostate tumor cells in the laboratory. The study also identifies a potential new molecular target for anti-tumor drugs: an enzyme known as cPLA2, which plays a key role in the chain leading from omega-6 fatty acids to prostate tumor cell growth.

The study was led by Millie Hughes-Fulford, PhD, director of the Laboratory of Cell Growth at SFVAMC and scientific advisor to the U.S. Undersecretary of Health for the Department of Veterans Affairs. It is being published in the September 2005 issue of Carcinogenesis, and is currently available online.

Working with human prostate cancer cells in tissue culture, Hughes-Fulford and her fellow researchers identified for the first time a direct chain of causation: When introduced into prostate tumor cells in culture, omega-6 fatty acid causes the production of cPLA2, which then causes the production of the enzyme COX2. In turn, COX2 stimulates the release of PGE2, a hormone-like molecule that promotes cell growth.

The study points out that 60 years ago in the United States, the dietary ratio of omega-6 to omega-3, a beneficial fatty acid, was 1 to 2. Today, the ratio is 25 to 1. Over that same 60 years, the incidence of prostate cancer in the U.S. has increased steadily.

The research was funded by awards from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and in part by grants from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Funding was administered by the Northern California Institute for Research and Education (NCIRE).

To contact our editorial team please email us at editorial@cnsmedia.com

Related Articles

Nutrition & Health News

In your blood: Blood sample could uncover whether a person is following their prescribed diet

20 Jun 2018 --- Clinical trials of diets and their health impacts are often plagued by participants’ poor adherence to assigned diets, making it difficult to detect the true effects of those diets. An analysis of small molecules called “metabolites” in a blood sample may be used to determine whether a person is following a prescribed diet, scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have shown. The new approach, described in a paper in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, could provide an objective and relatively easy-to-obtain measure of dietary adherence, potentially greatly reducing the uncertainty of dietary intake estimates.

Nutrition & Health News

New technology opens up space for creatine in liquid delivery forms: Prinova

20 Jun 2018 --- Microencapsulation technology, developed by AnaBio and distributed by Prinova, offers new potential for Creatine to be used in liquid applications. Typically, the sports nutrition ingredient is highly unstable in water, which reduces its effectiveness in ready-to-drink products.

Nutrition & Health News

Low maternal selenium may have consequences for mother's heart health in later life: Cypress Systems

18 Jun 2018 --- By increasing their risk of preeclampsia, mothers with low selenium levels may also be at increased risk for heart disease, stroke and high blood pressure later in life, a Cypress Systems executive summary suggests. The summary calls for higher levels of supplementation of high selenium yeast to combat heart health threats.

Nutrition & Health News

First time finding: Allergy to red meat may be a factor in heart disease

18 Jun 2018 --- A team of researchers says it has linked sensitivity to an allergen in red meat to the buildup of plaque in the arteries of the heart. While high saturated fat levels in red meat have long been known to contribute to heart disease for people in general, the new finding suggests that a subgroup of the population may be at heightened risk for a different reason – a food allergen. The study, which is supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health and appears in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

Nutrition & Health News

Cereal foods: Structure influences nutritional properties and satiety, VTT research suggests

15 Jun 2018 --- The structure of cereal foods has an impact on their digestion process and satiating capacity, a doctoral research conducted by Saara Pentikäinen, a research scientist at VTT in Finland, has found. Foods that consumers envision to be more filling produce higher feeling levels of satiety and foods that hydrate easily may also produce higher feelings of satiety. Furthermore, nutrients dissolved from the cereal foods into saliva and the body are higher in rye than wheat bread. Cereal foods are a significant source of carbohydrates, protein, vitamins and minerals and they can provide over half of all the dietary fiber (DF) depending on the population.

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/news/Omega-6-fatty-acids-promote-prostate-tumor-cell-growth.html