Medicinal Mushrooms Could Protect Against Dementia

dff9e1f7-99e3-4312-87f7-d7dec74dac4barticleimage.jpg

25 Jan 2017 --- New research has found that certain edible and medicinal mushrooms contain bioactive compounds that could enhance nerve growth in the brain. Researchers say that the mushrooms may be able to protect against neurotoxic stimuli such as inflammation that contribute to neurodegenerative diseases like dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

The evidence supporting a potential role of mushrooms as functional foods in reducing or delaying development of age-related neurodegeneration is presented in an article published in Journal of Medicinal Food, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

The study comes at a time when the world is facing an exponential increase in global level dementia in old age because of increasing life expectancy. Furthermore, the prevalence of neurodegenerative diseases such as dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD) continues to rise steadily and is expected to reach 42 million cases worldwide in 2020.

The researchers state that despite the advancement of medication, the management of these diseases remains largely ineffective. Therefore, there is a need to explore novel nature-based nutraceuticals to mitigate AD and other age-related neurodegenerative disorders.

Mushrooms and their extracts appear to hold many health benefits, including immune-modulating effects. A number of edible mushrooms have been shown to contain rare and exotic compounds that exhibit positive effects on brain cells both in vitro and in vivo.

The report sees researchers Chia Wei Phan, Pamela David, and Vikineswary Sabaratnam from the University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia summarize the scientific information on edible and culinary mushrooms with regard to their antidementia/AD active compounds and/or pharmacological test results.

The authors focus on the activity of bioactive components of mushrooms that may offer neuroprotective and cognitive benefits.

“In contrast to the body of literature on food ingredients that may benefit cardiometabolic diseases and cancer, very few studies have focused on food that may benefit neurodegenerative diseases,” says Journal of Medicinal Food Editor-in-Chief Sampath Parthasarathy, MBA, PhD, Florida Hospital Chair in Cardiovascular Sciences and Interim Associate Dean, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida.

“The current study might stimulate the identification of more food materials that are neuroprotective.”

To contact our editorial team please email us at editorial@cnsmedia.com

Related Articles

Health & Nutrition News

Protein boost for Boost: Nestlé ups the content in flagship “adult nutrition” product

14 Aug 2018 --- Nestlé’s flagship adult nutrition high protein drink, Boost, now packs an even bigger protein punch. The company has increased the protein content of Boost in the US from 15g per serving to 20g – a protein increase of 33 percent – in a bid to appeal to the 51 years and older demographic. The use of protein as a source of strength and recovery aid is no longer limited to marathon runners. This is clear as nutritional demands from the senior demographic spurs higher protein NPD.

Regulatory News

Pesticide Testing: NSF International updates dietary supplement certification standard

14 Aug 2018 --- NSF International and the NSF/ANSI 173 Joint Committee have updated the pesticide testing requirements included in NSF/ANSI 173, the only American National Standard for dietary supplements. A recent NSF study established chemical-specific pesticide limits for 185 pesticides that might be present in botanical ingredients used in dietary supplement ingredients.

Health & Nutrition News

UK women of childbearing age falling short on key micronutrient requirements, survey finds

13 Aug 2018 --- The micronutrient intake of women in their childbearing years, as well as young people in general, fall short in key micronutrients such as magnesium and selenium. UK researchers note that improvements in dietary quality are needed in young adulthood and mid-life. Alongside this, fortification and supplementation strategies may be considered to help adults achieve dietary targets at this life-stage when they should be at their “nutritional prime.”

Business News

Evolva net loss narrows, on track to deliver on set targets

10 Aug 2018 --- Swiss-headquartered biotechnology and fermentation ingredient supplier Evolva has reported that product sales doubled, reaching CHF1.8 million (US$1.8 million) in the first half of 2018. Total revenues reached CHF3.8 million in the first half of 2018, up 6% on last year, while their net loss narrowed to CHF14.7 million (first half 2017 loss CHF20.3 million).

Health & Nutrition News

Weekly roundup: Lycored awarded for campaign, Support for probiotics in countering depression

10 Aug 2018 --- This week, Lycored was awarded for their innovative #rethinkbeautiful campaign and Good in Bloom initiative, while a new study supports the hypothesis that the modification of microbial ecology in human gut by supplementing probiotics may be an alternative strategy to ameliorate or prevent depression.

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/news/Medicinal-Mushrooms-Could-Protect-Against-Dementia.html?tracking=Twofi-Related%20Articles&NewTracking=Health%20&%20Nutrition%20News