Instrument Measures Calorie Consumption By Monitoring “Tweets”

42586f71-3e23-4959-a59b-dc8b930ab30earticleimage.jpg

14 Feb 2017 --- A team of scientists have invented a new instrument for measuring how many calories people consume, by monitoring their social media posts such as tweets. The new device, named a “Lexicocalorimeter,” is described as being “a satellite image of how people in a state or city are eating and exercising."

“This can be a powerful public health tool,” says Peter Dodds, a scientist at the University of Vermont, who co-led the invention.

The Lexicocalorimeter gathers tens of millions of geo-tagged Twitter posts from across the country and fishes out thousands of food words -- like “Apples,” “ice cream” and “green beans.”

At the same time, it finds thousands of activity-related terms -- like “watching TV,” “skiing,” and even “alligator hunting” and “pole dancing.”

These giant bags of words then get scored, based on data about typical calorie content of foods and activity burn rates, and then compiled into two measures: "caloric input" and "caloric output."

The ratio of these two measures begins to paint a picture that might be of interest not just to athletes or weight-watchers, but also to mayors, public health officials, epidemiologists, or others interested in “public policy and collective self-awareness,” the team of scientists write in their new study.

The Lexicocalorimeter is open for visits by the public, and the current version gives a portrait of each of the contiguous US states.

For example, the tweet flow into the device suggests that Vermont consumes more calories, per capita, than the overall average for the US, due to "bacon" topping off its list of words. Tied for second in the US when states are ranked by bacon's contribution to caloric balance.

“We love to tweet about bacon,” says Chris Danforth, a UVM scientist and mathematician who co-led the new study, “But Vermont also expends more calories than average, the device indicates, thanks to relatively frequent appearances of the words “skiing,” “running,” “snowboarding,” and, yes, “sledding.””

And why does the Lexicocalorimeter suggest that New Jersey expends fewer calories than the US average? Below-average on “running” while the top of its low-intensity activity list is “getting my nails done.”

Overall, Colorado ranks first in the US for its caloric balance ("noodles" plus "running" seem to be a svelte pair) while Mississippi comes in last with relatively high representation of "cake" and "eating."

The new study suggests that the Lexicocalorimeter could provide a new - and real-time - measure of the US population's health. And the study shows that the device's remotely sensed results correlate very closely with other traditional measures of US well-being, like obesity and diabetes rates.

For the study, the team of scientists explored about 50 million geo-tagged tweets from 2011 and 2012 and report that "pizza" was the dominant contributor to the measure of "calories in" in nearly every state.

The dominant contributor to calories out: "watching TV or movies."

The nine scientists - led by professors and students at the University of Vermont's Computational Story Lab as well as researchers at the University of California Berkley, WIC in East Boston, MIT, University of Adelaide, and Drexel University - are quick to point out that the ratio of calories in to calories out in the new study are "not meaningful as absolute numbers, but rather have power for comparisons," they write.

The Lexicocalorimeter is part of a larger effort by the University of Vermont team to build a series of online instruments that can quantify health-related behaviors from social media.

“Given the right tools, our mobile phones will very soon know more about us than we know about ourselves,” says UVM's Chris Danforth. “While the Lexicocalorimeter is focused on eating and exercise, and the Hedonometer is measuring happiness, the methodology we're building is far more general, and will eventually contribute to a dashboard of public health measures to complement traditional sources of data.”

Related Articles

Nutrition & Health News

Special Report: Bone Health Supplementation Moves Beyond Dairy

22 May 2017 --- Bone health is becoming an increasingly researched topic, particularly as populations around the globe are becoming more aged. Consuming dairy products for strong bones has long been encouraged by governments and parents alike. However, as consumer preferences change, there is a growing need for non-dairy supplementation that can improve bone density. According to Innova Market Insights data, the number of product launches featuring bone health claims rose drastically from 364 in 2015, to 571 in 2016. NutritionInsight looks at some of the most recent bone health related product launches and studies.

Business News

Scientists Urge US Government to Meet Compliance Deadline for Nutrition Labels

22 May 2017 --- As US food industry groups continue to urge the government to delay the July 2018 compliance date for the updated nutrition facts label, consumer advocacy group and non-profit watchdog Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) claims that more than 40 scientists and researchers from across the country are calling for the date to stand.

Business News

No Such Thing as “Healthy Obesity”: Study

22 May 2017 --- “Healthy” obese people are still at higher risk of heart failure or stroke than the general population, according to research by scientists at the University of Birmingham. The results indicate that the concept of “healthy obesity” – a condition characterized by having normal markers of metabolic health despite a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more – is, in fact, a myth.

Nutrition & Health News

Neuroimaging Highlights Role of Omega 3 in Preventing Cognitive Decline

22 May 2017 --- Research involving neuroimaging has shown that people with higher omega 3 levels have increased blood flow in regions of the brain associated with memory and learning, according to a report in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. With the incidence of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) expected to triple in the coming decades, interest in dietary approaches for the prevention of cognitive decline has increased. In particular, the omega 3 fatty acids have shown anti-amyloid, anti-tau and anti-inflammatory actions in the brains of animals. 

 

Business News

Grilling or Microwaving Best Ways to Preserve Nutritional Value of Mushrooms

22 May 2017 --- A study by Spanish researchers has shown that microwaving and grilling are the best way to prepare mushrooms in terms of maintaining their nutritional profile. Mushrooms are considered valuable health foods, since they have a significant amount of dietary fiber and are poor in calories and fat. Moreover, they have a good protein content (20-30% of dry matter) which includes most of the essential amino acids.

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/news/Instrument-Measures-Calorie-Consumption-By-Monitoring-Tweets.html?tracking=Nutrition%20and%20Health%20News