High Fructose Consumption Linked to Increase of Liver Disease in Young Consumers

b4813027-ce8f-41dc-831f-ee311c0b3a53articleimage.jpg

14 Feb 2017 --- Researchers from the UK and Italy have suggested that high levels of dietary fructose and uric acid may be key in the development of poor liver health amongst children and adolescents.

They say high fructose intake may increase serum uric acid concentrations, and that both uric acid concentration and fructose consumption may be increased in individuals with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

Investigators also say they have established that fructose intake is independently associated with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Their conclusions are published in the Journal of Hepatology.

NAFLD, the accumulation of extra fat in liver cells in people who drink little or no alcohol, is recognized as the fastest growing cause of liver disease in both Western and developing countries.

It is estimated to affect up to 30% of the general population in Western countries and up to 9.6% of all children and 38% of obese children across a spectrum of liver disease, including NASH (defined as steatosis, hepatocyte ballooning and inflammation).

Although NASH is a less aggressive form of NAFLD, it can progress to severe fibrosis and cirrhosis, with development of hepatocellular carcinoma in adults.

“It is plausible that dietary fructose intake and uric acid concentrations are potential risk factors for liver disease progression in NAFLD,” explained senior investigator Valerio Nobili, MD, Chief of the Hepatometabolic Unit Liver Diseases Laboratory, Bambino Gesù Hospital, IRCCS, Rome, Italy.

“Numerous studies have shown that high uric acid levels are associated with metabolic syndrome and NAFLD, but to date, to the best of our knowledge, no studies have tested the independence of associations among uric acid concentrations, fructose consumption, and NASH confirmed by biopsy.”

A team of researchers in Italy and the UK studied 271 obese children and adolescents with NAFLD (155 males, mean age 12.5 years) who underwent liver biopsy.

All patients completed a food frequency questionnaire, indicating when specific foods were consumed (breakfast, morning snack, lunch, afternoon snack, dinner, etc.), how often (every day of the week, sometimes, or never), and portion size.

Major sources of dietary fructose among children and adolescents are soda and other sweetened beverages.

Nearly 90% reported drinking sodas and soft drinks one or more times a week.

Almost 95% of patients regularly consumed morning and afternoon snacks consisting of crackers, pizza and salty food, biscuits, yogurt, or other snacks.

In the group of patients studied, 37.6% of patients had NASH and 47% of patients with NASH had high uric acid compared with 29.7% of patients who did not have NASH.

Fructose consumption was independently associated with high uric acid, which occurred more frequently in patients with NASH than in not-NASH patients.

“In this study, we show for the first time that uric acid concentrations and dietary fructose consumption are independently and positively associated with NASH.”

“The development of NASH may markedly affect life expectancy and quality of life in affected individuals and therefore it is crucial to understand the risk factors for NASH in children and adolescents in order to design effective interventions which can be used safely to treat this young group of patients,” Dr. Nobili concluded.

The researchers say that efforts geared towards behavior modification, nutrition education, and limiting access to soda and other sweetened beverages could potentially reduce fructose consumption in this particular population.

To contact our editorial team please email us at editorial@cnsmedia.com

Related Articles

Nutrition & Health News

In your blood: Blood sample could uncover whether a person is following their prescribed diet

20 Jun 2018 --- Clinical trials of diets and their health impacts are often plagued by participants’ poor adherence to assigned diets, making it difficult to detect the true effects of those diets. An analysis of small molecules called “metabolites” in a blood sample may be used to determine whether a person is following a prescribed diet, scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have shown. The new approach, described in a paper in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, could provide an objective and relatively easy-to-obtain measure of dietary adherence, potentially greatly reducing the uncertainty of dietary intake estimates.

Nutrition & Health News

Personalized nutrition: Mindful and aware consumers drive market opportunity

19 Jun 2018 --- Personalized nutrition has taken its place as a key industry topic, spurring the launch of a number of innovative start-ups using cutting-edge technologies to offer precise nutrition advice to consumers. This growing industry space will be the topic of discussion at the Personalized Nutrition Innovation Summit, which is taking place in San Francisco on June 26-27.

Nutrition & Health News

Saturated fat increases risk of psychopathology, study suggests

19 Jun 2018 --- Adolescent rats who consume a diet high in saturated fats are at an increased risk of psychopathology in adulthood, a study published in the journal Brain, Behavior, and Immunity has found. Moreover, the researchers from Loma Linda University in California found that the areas of the brain that handle the fear/stress response were altered to the point that subjects began exhibiting behaviors that mirror post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The findings could help researchers to target mental health illness in the coming generations and express the lasting, and potentially irreversible, effects of a poor diet.

Packaging & Technology News

Raised Real: Maximizing nutrition and minimizing waste in infant nutrition

19 Jun 2018 --- Tapping into a space opened up by “millennial parents” who want nutritious food for their infants, with an environmentally-friendly seal of appeal, is Raised Real. The California start-up offers an innovative baby food meal-kit delivery solution, touting nutritionally balanced meals and an innovative freeze-cooling packaging system. Speaking to Santiago Merea, CEO and co-founder, Steven Kontz, co-founder and CFO and Benish Shah, VP of Marketing, NutritionInsight looks into how the company is minimizing food waste while maximizing nutrition and protecting the environment through packaging choices. 

Nutrition & Health News

Infant nutrition (part 1): Challenges in feeding the first 1,000 days

18 Jun 2018 --- The World Health Organization (WHO) solidly recommends breastfeeding for infants. However, there are situations – medical, situational or personal – that necessitate good quality breast milk substitutes (BMS), such as formulas. In a bid to produce a formula that is closest in composition to human breast milk, manufacturers face a range of unique R&D challenges. In this two-part series on Infant Nutrition, NutritionInsight speaks to a number of key suppliers and experts about these challenges.

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/news/High-Fructose-Consumption-Linked-to-Increase-of-Liver-Disease-in-Young-Consumers.html