Gut Microbiota Could Play a Role in Developing Alzheimer’s Disease

6bef5450-1503-4216-a627-e7b0f99e2c95articleimage.jpg

13 Feb 2017 --- New research from Lund University in Sweden has shown that intestinal bacteria can accelerate the development of Alzheimer's disease. The researchers behind the study say that the results open up the door to new opportunities for preventing and treating the disease.

Because gut bacteria has a major impact on how people feel through the interaction between the immune system, the intestinal mucosa and the diet, the composition of the gut microbiota is of great interest to research on diseases such as Alzheimer's.

Exactly how human gut microbiota composition is composed depends on which bacteria an individual receives at birth, our genes and our diet. By studying both healthy and diseased mice, the researchers found that mice suffering from Alzheimer's have a different composition of gut bacteria compared to mice that are healthy.

They also studied Alzheimer's disease in mice that completely lacked bacteria to further test the relationship between intestinal bacteria and the disease.

Mice without bacteria had a significantly smaller amount of beta-amyloid plaque in the brain, which are the lumps that form at the nerve fibers in cases of Alzheimer's disease.

To clarify the link between intestinal flora and the occurrence of the disease, the researchers transferred intestinal bacteria from diseased mice to germ-free mice, and discovered that the mice developed more beta-amyloid plaques in the brain compared to if they had received bacteria from healthy mice.

“Our study is unique as it shows a direct causal link between gut bacteria and Alzheimer's disease,” says researcher Frida Fåk Hållenius, at the Food for Health Science Centre.

“It was striking that the mice which completely lacked bacteria developed much less plaque in the brain.”

The researchers say that their results will now allow them to begin researching ways to prevent the disease and delay the onset.

“We consider this to be a major breakthrough as we used to only be able to give symptom-relieving antiretroviral drugs.”

Related Articles

Nutrition & Health News

Body’s own fat metabolism fights against harmful effects of sugar, study finds

19 Sep 2017 --- Researchers from Aarhus University in Denmark have discovered a metabolite that reveals how the body's fat metabolism provides protection against the harmful effects of sugar. The researchers have indicated this has the potential to explain the chemical link between a low-carbohydrate diet and healthy aging.

Nutrition & Health News

Sabinsa granted US patent for synbiotic composition of shelf-stable probiotic and cranberry fibers

18 Sep 2017 --- Sabinsa has been granted a US patent on the company’s shelf-stable probiotic LactoSpore in combination with cranberry seed fibers. The granted patent (US9717766) discloses a method of increasing the viable colony count of Bacillus coagulans MTCC 5856 in a synbiotic composition containing natural plant fibers from Vaccinium oxycoccos (cranberry). The cranberry fibers in this composition were observed to increase the viable count of Bacillus coagulans MTCC 5856.

Nutrition & Health News

Diet plays pivotal role in staying sharp as Alzheimer’s disease linked to nutritional problems

18 Sep 2017 --- Decreased glucose metabolism in medial prefrontal areas of the brain is associated with nutritional status in patients with prodromal and early Alzheimer’s disease (AD), according to results from a Multimodal Neuroimaging for AD Diagnosis (MULNIAD) study. Nutritional problems, especially weight loss, are commonly seen in individuals with Alzheimer’s disease; however, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood.
 

Nutrition & Health News

Landmark in calorie intake understanding as link to extended lifespan explained

18 Sep 2017 --- Researchers have found an explanation for why cutting calorie intake could dramatically extend lifespan in certain animal species. In work published online in Nature Communications, investigators at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University (LKSOM) in Philadelphia, US, are the first to show that the speed at which the epigenome changes with age is associated with lifespan across species and that calorie restriction slows this process of change, potentially explaining its effects on longevity.

Business News

Fat-regulating enzyme could hold key to preventing cancer, diabetes and other diseases

18 Sep 2017 --- Scientists at Rutgers University-New Brunswick in the US have found that getting rid of the enzyme known as phosphatidic acid phosphatase can increase the risk of cancer, diabetes, inflammation and other medical issues. Their findings were published online in the Journal of Biological Chemistry last month.

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/news/Gut-Microbiota-Could-Play-a-Role-in-Developing-Alzheimers-Disease.html