Gut Microbiome and Diet May Affect Depression

219cb5ec-90f6-45c8-b9fb-ccb2abdd0435articleimage.jpg

17 Feb 2017 --- An international group of researchers have published a study in the paper, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatic, that demonstrates new links between the intestinal flora and several disorders such as depression.

Persistent low-grade immune-inflammatory processes, such as oxidative and nitrosative stress and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation, are integral to the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder.

The microbiome, intestinal compositional changes, and resultant bacterial translocation add a new element to the bidirectional interactions of the gut-brain axis.

New evidence implicates these pathways in the onset of major depressive disorder.

In addition, abnormalities in the gut-brain axis are associated with several chronic non-communicable disorders, which frequently co-occur in individuals with depression, including but not limited to irritable bowel syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, obesity, and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

The composition of the gut microbiota is influenced by several genetic and environmental factors (e.g. diet).

Several lines of evidence indicate that gut-microbiota-diet interactions play a significant pathophysiological role in depression and related medical comorbidities.

Gut dysbiosis and the leaky gut may influence several pathways implicated in the biology of major depressive disorder, including but not limited to immune activation, oxidative and nitrosative stress, and neuroplasticity cascades.

However, methodological inconsistencies and limitations limit comparisons across studies.

The authors conclude that intestinal dysbiosis and the leaky gut may constitute a key pathophysiological link between depression and its medical comorbidities.

This emerging literature opens relevant preventative and therapeutic perspectives.

Related Articles

Nutrition & Health News

Sporadic fasting helps fight obesity, study finds

18 Oct 2017 --- Up to 16 weeks of intermittent fasting without otherwise having to count calories helps fight obesity and other metabolic disorders, and the benefits of such fasting are already noticeable after six weeks. This is according to a study by Kyoung-Han Kim and Yun Hye Kim in the journal Cell Research which is published by Springer Nature. Intermittent fasting in mice helped to kick-start the animals' metabolism and to burn fat by generating body heat. 

Nutrition & Health News

Fonterra probiotics may reduce postnatal depression: study

18 Oct 2017 --- Results of a New Zealand study suggest that Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 (DR20) taken during and post-pregnancy positively affected symptoms of maternal depression and anxiety after birth. According to study author Dr. Rebecca Slykerman, the findings are significant as taking a probiotic to assist in postnatal depression is a potentially simple way to help mothers with their mental health.

Nutrition & Health News

Hard to digest: Stress might be just as unhealthy as junk food to women

18 Oct 2017 --- A new study at Brigham Young University (BYU) in the US has found that stress may be just as harmful to female bodies as a bad diet. The study with mice shows that in females, stress causes digestive microorganisms to behave similarly to how they act with a high-fat diet.

Nutrition & Health News

Alp Nutrition debuts sports liquid supplement in the US

18 Oct 2017 --- Alp Nutrition, a company based in Germany with product ingredients organically grown and harvested in the Swiss Alps, has launched its new Alp Sport liquid supplement in the US marketplace. Alp Sport aims to support and increase physical performance, the immune system, fast regeneration and muscle building.

Nutrition & Health News

Vitamin D activation pathways in inflammation and bone health uncovered

17 Oct 2017 --- Researchers have identified a region of the genome that regulates vitamin D activation in the kidneys, opening the door for more sophisticated treatments of diseases, including bone and immune disorders, involving vitamin D. The results of this research will be published in the October 20 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/news/Gut-Microbiome-and-Diet-May-Affect-Depression.html?tracking=Nutrition%20and%20Health%20News