German Research Boost for Improving Heart Health

e739fb4d-ea64-4db0-9947-eb51432385caarticleimage.jpg

17 Feb 2017 --- Three universities have joined forced with nutrition and agriculture institutions in Germany to form NutriCARD, aiming to research and analysis the production and marketing of heart-healthy food.

NutriCARD is the inter-state German alliance of the Martin Luther University in Halle (Saxony-Anhalt), the Friedrich Schiller University in Jena (Thuringia) and the Leipzig University (Saxony) on matters of nutritional and health research. 

“NutriCARD is thus something new for the research landscape in Central Germany. Various individual competences of the sites are bundled in this cluster and used synergistically,” explains Dr. Toni Meier.

“We are concerned with the question of how one can lower cardiovascular and metabolic diseases with intelligent and goal-oriented nutrition. In Germany alone, approximately 157,000 premature deaths could be avoided each year with nutrition that is healthier for the heart,” he says.

“Applied to Europe, projections start at approximately two million preventable deaths. With many consumers, however, pointing a warning finger is unlikely to lead to any real improvement. After all, every walk in the supermarket is also a little challenge that many consumers have to master on a daily basis.”

“Color, design, brands, taste and price ultimately influence our purchasing decision and often lead to a certain degree of confusion among consumers. Health is not always the top priority,” explains the scientist. “The main task of nutriCARD is the health upgrading of familiar foods by means of reformulations that do not change anything in the flavor or appearance of the products. We would like the consumer’s first choice to be the healthy choice.” 

We are researching this and producing “open knowledge”. We make the results available to foodstuff producers free of charge. But it is best to explain it using an example,” adds Meier.
Vitamin D is needed for a healthy cardiovascular system and sturdy bones, but the majority of Germans are not sufficiently supplied with it, according to Meier.

Apart from fish and mushrooms, there are hardly any foodstuffs with significant vitamin D quantities and artificial enrichment is greatly restricted explains Meier. 

“Together with the researchers of the University of Halle and of Agrargenossenschaft Pretzsch e.G., we have supported the body’s own formation of vitamin D in animals with the use of UV light in the coops of laying hens.

“Under optimal conditions, we achieve a vitamin level one to five times higher than that in conventional eggs.” 

The partners from Jena have managed, for the first time, to replace animal fats in a “Lyoner” sausage with fiber, without impairing its appearance or flavor. And the researchers from Leipzig are dealing with the question of how the sometimes questionable quantities of saturated fatty acids in our food can be replaced with proteins from the lupine. 

One product that is already on the market is the dairy Herzgut in Thuringia sells the OMEghurt, a yogurt enriched with Omega 3 fatty acids.

Salt, sugar and fat 
According to Meier, too much salt, sugar and fat cost the German health care system approximately €17 billion (US$18.1 billion) in direct treatment costs. 

“Even a slight fall could reduce more than just the economic consequences. The mortality rate from widespread diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, different forms of cancer and secondary diseases of obesity would be substantially influenced”, explains Toni Meier.

The Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), granted €5 million (US$5.3 million) for the period from 2015-18 and following an interim audit in 2018, the cluster may get further funding until 2021. 

Related Articles

Nutrition & Health News

Special Report: Bone Health Supplementation Moves Beyond Dairy

22 May 2017 --- Bone health is becoming an increasingly researched topic, particularly as populations around the globe are becoming more aged. Consuming dairy products for strong bones has long been encouraged by governments and parents alike. However, as consumer preferences change, there is a growing need for non-dairy supplementation that can improve bone density. According to Innova Market Insights data, the number of product launches featuring bone health claims rose drastically from 364 in 2015, to 571 in 2016. NutritionInsight looks at some of the most recent bone health related product launches and studies.

Business News

Scientists Urge US Government to Meet Compliance Deadline for Nutrition Labels

22 May 2017 --- As US food industry groups continue to urge the government to delay the July 2018 compliance date for the updated nutrition facts label, consumer advocacy group and non-profit watchdog Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) claims that more than 40 scientists and researchers from across the country are calling for the date to stand.

Business News

No Such Thing as “Healthy Obesity”: Study

22 May 2017 --- “Healthy” obese people are still at higher risk of heart failure or stroke than the general population, according to research by scientists at the University of Birmingham. The results indicate that the concept of “healthy obesity” – a condition characterized by having normal markers of metabolic health despite a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more – is, in fact, a myth.

Nutrition & Health News

Neuroimaging Highlights Role of Omega 3 in Preventing Cognitive Decline

22 May 2017 --- Research involving neuroimaging has shown that people with higher omega 3 levels have increased blood flow in regions of the brain associated with memory and learning, according to a report in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. With the incidence of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) expected to triple in the coming decades, interest in dietary approaches for the prevention of cognitive decline has increased. In particular, the omega 3 fatty acids have shown anti-amyloid, anti-tau and anti-inflammatory actions in the brains of animals. 

 

Business News

Grilling or Microwaving Best Ways to Preserve Nutritional Value of Mushrooms

22 May 2017 --- A study by Spanish researchers has shown that microwaving and grilling are the best way to prepare mushrooms in terms of maintaining their nutritional profile. Mushrooms are considered valuable health foods, since they have a significant amount of dietary fiber and are poor in calories and fat. Moreover, they have a good protein content (20-30% of dry matter) which includes most of the essential amino acids.

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/news/German-Research-Boost-for-Improving-Heart-Health.html