Reading Food Labels is a Proven Tool for Losing Weight: Study

consumer label.jpg

16 Sep 2010 --- Washington State University Economist Bidisha Mandal has found that middle-aged Americans who want to lose weight and who take up the label-reading habit are more likely to lose weight than those who don't.

Sep 16 2010 --- Diet and exercise have long been the top two elements of effective weight loss. Now add a third: reading the labels on packaged foods.

Washington State University Economist Bidisha Mandal has found that middle-aged Americans who want to lose weight and who take up the label-reading habit are more likely to lose weight than those who don't. In some cases, label reading is even more effective than exercise.

"I'm finding that reading labels is useful," said Mandal, an assistant professor in the WSU School of Economic Sciences. "People who are trying to lose weight want to know what they're buying and preparing and many do better if they use labels to find what they need to know."

Writing in the latest Journal of Consumer Affairs, Mandal analyzes the responses of more than 3,700 people who regularly took a national survey asking about their label-reading habits while attempting to lose or control their weight. Among her findings:

• If you want to lose weight, you have a better chance of success if you read a food label when you first buy a product.
• People are more successful at losing weight when they add label reading to their exercise program.
• Label readers who do not exercise have a slightly greater chance of losing weight than those who exercise but do not read labels.
• Women are more likely to read food labels when they buy a product for the first time, possibly because they are responsible for buying food and cooking. They are also more successful than men in losing weight.
• In a case of good news and bad news, Mandal found that overweight and obese label readers are more likely to lose weight. But only a little more than one-third lost weight, while nearly half gained weight. This confirms what many middle-aged people know losing weight is hard and often unsuccessful. But Mandal found overweight and obese people at least have a better chance if they read the label.

The analysis underscores the value of the U.S. Nutrition Labeling and Education Act, which has required standardized nutrition facts on packaged foods since 1994, Mandal said. She adds that the findings build the case for posting nutritional information on vending machines and in many restaurants, as planned under the new federal health care reform bill.
 

To contact our editorial team please email us at editorial@cnsmedia.com

Related Articles

Nutrition & Health News

Confusing cereals? UK consumer group calls for clearer labeling post Brexit

20 Jun 2018 --- A Which? investigation into the sugar content of “adult” breakfast cereals has unveiled high sugar levels and ignited calls for the UK Government to make traffic light labeling mandatory after Brexit, when EU laws are transferred to British law.

Nutrition & Health News

SlimBiome muesli to hit UK shelves

20 Jun 2018 --- Fruit, nut and seed supplier John Morley Group are teaming up with OptiBiotix health to deliver a weight-management breakfast muesli utilizing the SlimBiome technology. OptiBiotix’s patented Slimbiome claims to support weight-loss management by modifying the activity of the microbiome. The exclusive license granted to John Morley marks the first foray of SlimBiome into the UK breakfast market.

Nutrition & Health News

“Shockingly” salty salads on UK high street, lobby group calls for action

19 Jun 2018 --- A nationwide product survey by UK lobby group Action on Salt highlights the high salt and saturated fat levels of restaurant, retail and fast food salads. The group, based at the Wolfson Institute, Barts & The London, Queen Mary University of London, found that the salt content of salads bought from restaurants, sandwich/coffee shops and fast food outlets has increased by 13 percent since they were last surveyed in 2014 (from 1.65g to 1.86g per serving on average), flagging “a distinct lack of commitment” from the food industry to reduce salt, according to the group.

Nutrition & Health News

Gluten-free mainstreams: Is the trend leading to unhealthy weight control?

18 Jun 2018 --- Individuals who value gluten-free foods are more likely to eat a higher quality diet but are also more likely to have unhealthy weight control behaviors. This is according to a new study exploring the sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics of young adults who value gluten-free as an important food claim.

Nutrition & Health News

DSM’s Nutrition Improvement focus: Fresh thinking on global nutrition and food fortification

15 Jun 2018 --- “We work with our customers and the larger malnutrition-fighting community to treat and prevent malnutrition,” Anthony Hehir, Director of DSM’s Nutrition Improvement Business Segment, tells NutritionInsight. Using its solid science and technical heritage, DSM is striving to fight global malnutrition through its “business with a purpose” approach. NutritionInsight spoke to Hehir, gaining an insight into what drives the company’s staple food fortification technologies, research and future nutrition endeavors. 

More Articles
URL : http://www.nutritioninsight.com:80/headlines/Reading-Food-Labels-is-a-Proven-Tool-for-Losing-Weight-Study.html